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Topic-icon what grass seed should I ask for?

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1 week 4 days ago #546077 by Anakei

I have fenced the chooks off and want to reseed the back lawn which is really more of a paddock. It currently has lot of weeds which I will spray off and quite a lot of clover . Lawn seed costs an arm and a leg so I was planning to go to Farmlands to get a bag of seed on the assumption that it will be cheaper. I don't want to make a pillock of myself so is it available in small quantities and what should I ask for? I want a clover mix suitable for chooks and rabbits, for about 600sq m. ( and yes I do know that the pasture grass is likely to grow quicker than lawn grass :) - I just top it now and then)


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1 week 4 days ago #546078 by LongRidge

I very seriously hope that Farmlands will not make you feel silly by asking them for a general pasture mix to do 600 sq meters. Because your chooks and rabbits are unlikely to get ryegrass staggers I would get one with high endophyte if you desire ryegrass in the mix.
Farmlands staff have been told by the management to treat every customer courteously. If that does not happen then get back to me, as I am a shareholder.
I would also be inclined to buy a bag of Ballance lawn fertiliser too.

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1 week 4 days ago #546080 by Anakei

Thanks Longridge. I didn't want to ask if they only supply by the ton :lol:


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1 week 4 days ago #546090 by muri

I went into PGGs yesterday and got rye grass clover mix. It comes in 25 kg bags and they decanted it to give me 10 kilo to oversow my pastures where the grass has dried up and died in the drought.
If they wont break open the larger sack for you, contact Newton seeds in auckland and they will post out for you what you want. They also do a lot of specialist grass seeds for specific animals if you wanted

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1 week 4 days ago #546097 by Blueberry

Anakei, on a different Note, if you want to use it for your 'small stock", Kings Seeds has a section Field Crops, where they offer specific seed mixes for Chickens, www.kingsseeds.co.nz/shop/Field+Selectio...ken+Greens-4230.html
or Herbal lay for grazing animals: www.kingsseeds.co.nz/shop/Field+Selectio...ng+Animals-4240.html
Just another option.


[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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1 week 4 days ago #546099 by tonybaker

leave the clover there as it helps fix nitrogen, which the grass needs. If you can scratch up the surface a bit and broadcast seed then drag a pallet over it to cover the seed, it should be ok. Try to sow seed around the new moon. I think you need around 20kg of seed. Those cheap seed sowers from Bunnings do a good job.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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1 week 3 days ago #546106 by Cigar

20 kg is enough to do 1 hectare, 10,000 square meters.
For 600 square meters you only need a kilo or two.

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1 week 3 days ago #546112 by tonybaker

you are right Cigar, google moved the decimal point!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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1 week 3 days ago #546113 by muri

I have always found Newton seeds to be reliable, kings very hit and miss.
Am interested in what explanation Tony you would have for sowing at new moon.
All the research I have read shows before full moon gives best germination so I am interested to know what forces are operating to make the new moon seed sowing time

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1 week 3 days ago #546119 by Anakei

Thanks for all your suggestions :)
Tonybaker I'm glad you have downscaled the weight from 25 kg to 2 kg - That nearly gave me a heart attack. And the pallet is an excellent idea - I was wondering how to tread or roll it in.

Blueberry I looked at the Kings seeds catalogue first and saw the chicken greens, but as their paddock also doubles as the back lawn I wanted something more grass like. However now we have erected Colditz for the chooks I can look at closing off a bit at a time and sowing chicken greens there.

After I posted this I scored a couple of kilos of Kings Seeds horse mix from a friend who no longer needs it. It has a mixture of grasses but no rye, and chicory, plantain and white and sub clover, so I think this will answer nicely. I am oversowing existing grass so there is probably rye already in there.

Muri Thanks for mentioning Newtons Seeds. I've never heard of them and now have a new site to browse... Interesting about sowing with the moon..The Gardener Magazine recommends sowing around the first quarter which unluckily is this weekend so I won't get it done in time. This project is earmarked for the Easter break so may be a bit late. I'm probably going to watch the weather and prepare the ground but not sow until we have some consistent rain forecast.

As always - you lot are the fount of all knowledge :lol:


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1 week 3 days ago #546125 by LongRidge

If I was over-sowing I would keep the animals off for a few days beforehand and spread slug bait if your hens have left any slugs and snails on your property.

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1 week 3 days ago #546130 by tonybaker

At the new moon, the lunar gravity pulls water up, and causes the seeds to swell and burst. This factor, coupled with the increasing moonlight creates balanced root and leaf growth. Full moon is good for root crops.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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1 week 1 day ago #546151 by Mudlerk

I'm not sure the moon's gravity is increased by our being able to see more of the area of it that's in sunlight. If you're going to risk planting under a full moon, keep an eye out for werewolves!

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1 week 1 day ago #546154 by Hawkspur

The effect of lunar gravitation is relative to distance, and also affected by whether it is working with or at right angles to solar gravitation. Spring or large tides occur when the sun, earth and moon are in alignment, which is at both new and full moons. The moon and earth are also in elliptical orbits meaning the distances vary during their year, with the sun being closest in early January (perihelion) and the moon in perigee at varying dates because it is not in sync -the elliptical orbit is also not in sync with the phases, as can be seen on this graph of moon distance at full moon. www.geoastro.de/moon/FullMoon/index.html
Whether the changing gravitational fields influence growth rates or germination is another matter.

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1 week 23 hours ago #546164 by Stikkibeek

Mudlerk wrote: I'm not sure the moon's gravity is increased by our being able to see more of the area of it that's in sunlight. If you're going to risk planting under a full moon, keep an eye out for werewolves!

Easy to fix that problem, just plant garlic! :whistle:


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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