Moving an existing fence to a new strainer post

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3 weeks 12 hours ago #559580 by Hertz Donut
I've built a few fences now but all of them have been internal, and this one is more of a challenge, so I'd like a sanity check from those who may have done similar, thanks.

Currently a boundary fence (8 wire, post and batten) is strained off a post that is about 20m into one of my paddocks. I want to put in a new crossing that will require me to remove that 20m section of fencing. I've put in a new strainer post on the boundary line but now I need to move the wires from the existing post to the new one. The fence is only 5 years old so all wires, posts and battens are in good condition.

For each wire, my initial thought is to attach my chain strainer to the new post and the wire to hold the tension in the fence that will remain, then cut the wire off the old post and shorten it, slide on an inline wire strainer, tie the wire off at the new post, tighten up the wire strainer, then release the chain strainer.

A friend who has many years of LSB/small farm experience thinks I might not even need the chain strainer as long as I do one wire at a time. Am I being over-cautious and the chain strainer isn't required? Could I just wind the tension off the existing wire strainer and move the wire, then re-tension with a new inline strainer? Or will this put undue stress on the battens/wire on the remaining fence? I've only ever replaced wire that was completely slack so I don't know how much tension (and hence recoil) will be stored in the fence, which is about 130m long.

Don't ask me, it was on its side when I got here.

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3 weeks 10 hours ago #559581 by LongRidge
If you do one wire at a time then the cut wire will not go zooming off into the distance, so no chain fencing strainer is needed, so your friend is correct.
Get permanent strainers that have a wire threading hole in the V attachment part so that you don't need to make a small length of wire to attach the strainer to.
Start with the bottom wire, and you may need to cut the second-to-bottom wire to give yourself enough room.
Cut the wires long enough to get around the strainer post, tie the knot, and enough length to be able to have 6 or 8 winds on the strainer.
Do not tighten the strainers until you have got a good post stay in position.
If you are careful and lucky enough you might be able to get the strainers in a verticle line down the fence.
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3 weeks 10 hours ago #559582 by tonybaker
yes, start at the bottom so that the top wire retains the strain then work your way up.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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3 weeks 10 hours ago #559583 by Hertz Donut
Ok thanks folks, after thinking about it some more I realised it's really no different to having a single broken wire in a fence.

I always use pass-through strainers, they make it so much quicker and simpler, with less room for shoddy work and mistakes. It irks me when I forget to slip one on before doing a termination knot though.

Don't ask me, it was on its side when I got here.

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2 weeks 2 days ago #559589 by Hertz Donut
Fence moved, no issues encountered...yet. Wasn't my best tie-off work and one of the wire strainers ended up in the wrong position (nudged against the stay) but I can easily cut and move it later if it proves to be an issue.

Don't ask me, it was on its side when I got here.

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2 weeks 1 day ago #559590 by LongRidge
The older the wire that you are using, the harder it gets, so good tidy knots are more difficult when using old wire. With the wires that you have used, remember that wire lengthens when the air is warm and contracts in cold weather. If you have made the wires tight, remember to loosen them slightly soon. You should do this with all fences - tighten them in summer, loosen them in autumn.

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