Vinyl tile flooring for our sleepout

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4 years 2 months ago #550349 by lsbloke
Hi LSBers

We re refurbishing a sleepout on our place and are looking to put adhesive vinyl tiles over the plywood floor.

We ve been told that options include a ) nailing down 4.8mm thick hardiboard sheets which get primed then stick the tiles down

or b) paint on some smoothing compound which gets sanded and primed

anyone out there have experience of getting a good finish with either option or any other we have not heard about??

any advice gratefully received

cheers

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4 years 2 months ago #550354 by John M
Have you looked at a floating floor option where you don't have to do floor levelling? (unless it's too bad - check the specs of whatever you buy, they usually have guidelines over how much irregularity is permissible)

Options include laminate flooring, Rigid (WPC, SPC and a plethora of acronyms), or even a heavier vinyl tile, usually, 5mm thick.

Laminate has an HDF/MDF core so is susceptible to water damage, if the door can be left open with the chance of rain blowing in then avoid it. It will, however, be the best for fade resistance if you have high sun.
The newer flooring is rigid or hybrid. Lots of options and you get what you pay for. Cheap cash and carry boxes from a large box retailer will likely have issues with a brittle core, may have flatter finishes that look fake. Flooring retailers can point you to a better quality plank and discuss features and benefits that may advantage you, or that you may not need.
Heavier 'loose lay' type vinyl tiles often still move, so it's often best to use a pressure-sensitive glue for these anyway.

Personally, with my flooring knowledge, if it was my sleepout, I'd go rigid. But that is only my personal opinion :)

If you're not glueing the floor down, you'll need to allow suitable expansion gaps. Best is to remove skirtings and allow a good 6mm gap all round and install skirting boards afterwards. Again, check specs as product to product will vary.

The only other factor is allowing the product to acclimatise adequately. This will reduce or eliminate a lot of future expansion or contraction related issues.

All the best, John

Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

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4 years 2 months ago - 4 years 2 months ago #550355 by Stikkibeek
i know that whatever is under it has a bearing on how warm or cold it can feel. We have original lino type covering on the bathroom floor which is glued down on a hardboard base. It is freezing in there in the winter. We replaced the kitchen vinyl when we did the kitchen up, and the hardboard was removed and a type of modern composite board was put down in its place. The kitchen floor used to be freezing too, but now it's nice and warm in the winter.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last edit: 4 years 2 months ago by Stikkibeek.

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4 years 2 months ago #550375 by lsbloke
Thanks folks

there is now underfloor insulation and the floor is 18mm plywood sheets - its pretty flat but to get a flat finish we store has recommended hardboard primer then the tiles

I guess I'm keen to hear whether the hardboard or the levelling compound methods of preparation work best before laying the tiles

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4 years 2 months ago #550385 by tonybaker
Bunnings have 3m wide vinyl flooring that does not need sticking down. I have used it straight over concrete and it seems durable and warm as it has a flock backing. Best take the skirtings off and use them to anchor the edges, and a metal lath in the doorway.
www.bunnings.co.nz/senso-3m-white-lifest...vinyl-sheet_p6610225

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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4 years 2 months ago #550390 by John M
The Senso vinyl range is a good product, the more professional ranges are sold through the flooring stores. If the decors work, try to go the heavier weight if you're wanting comfort, acoustical benefits and insulation properties. A word of caution lay it out loosely in the room but allow it to relax and acclimatise as if you install it cold, and then anchor the edges, it will relax and 'grow' and you'll end up with lumps. The heavier ones can also be cut tight to the room perimeter without the need to anchor it down. Just a J bar across the doorways to eliminate any potential trip hazard.

If you really want to lock it down, after trimming the final shape, lift the edges back and spray contact adhesive lightly applied, allow to tack off touch dry and then lay down and press in place. This will anchor it sufficiently.

John

Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

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4 years 2 months ago #550393 by lsbloke
thanks to everyone who gave great advice

we've made our choice and will sand the plywood as best we can - bog up any flaws and holes, clean, prime and stick down the tiles

cheers

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4 years 2 months ago #550394 by tonybaker
Hope you screwed down the plywood?

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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4 years 2 months ago #550430 by linrae
no further apart than 75mm

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4 years 2 months ago #550464 by linrae
hope you did bogging up before sanding
WHATS THE OUTCOME of job put picture up

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4 years 1 month ago #550567 by lsbloke
Thanks for taking an interest folks

a builder reckons the floor and the ply is flat enough to put the vinyl tiles directly on - after a light sand with an orbital sander bogging up any joints/ nailholes/ etc and priming!!

So that what we are going to do - after the shops open up again of course

also just looking at specials being offered by some of the mobile flooring folks - if that works out and they'll do the prep we may switch to plan c and let them take care of it all

will let you know in due course

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4 years 1 month ago #550663 by Hadlo
Although the vinyl tiles may be called "self adhesive" I would definitely recommend using a contact glue on each tile as well, something like Ados F2. I have seen these used before over a brand new underlay board and they have still lifted at the edges.
The following user(s) said Thank You: lsbloke

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4 years 1 month ago #550665 by lsbloke
Thanks Hadlo

we'll deffo use adhesive - the sleepout does not get regular use but the temp in there will vary really widely - cold at night and v hot when its sunny - I'm guessing if they are glued down - it will last longer

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4 years 1 month ago #550791 by matua
Hey, if you haven't committed to it yet I would find an alternative.

No longer in the trade, but I got A LOT of work from replacing "adhesive backed tiles". They don't last very long, less so in direct sunlight or wet areas.

Also, level to a builder and level to a flooring guy are two very different things.

You 100% don't need to lay another layer of ply. A good sand of the joins and a little self leveling would be fine.

If you are set on the DIY approach, a thicker loose lay vinyl tile would be best. The thicker product is more forgiving on an imperfect subfloor.
The following user(s) said Thank You: lsbloke

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4 years 1 month ago #550795 by lsbloke
Cheers matua

which self leveling material do you recommend - the sleepout is around 9x4 and we'll use the same flooring throughout ie kitchen/living, bed and bathroom.

will loose lay vinyl tiles do the job?? any brand better than others??

Thanks

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