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Topic-icon orphan lambs wont leave home!

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1 week 4 days ago #546081 by Si

My orphan lambs (16 weeks, 14 weeks and 3 weeks old) have lived in my house all their lives due to healrh problems, but over the last few weeks the oldest is now weaned, middle one a week off weaning and have been spending most of the day outside eating well on grass, although as soon as a spot of rain drops they huddle by kitchen door bleating. Iv ignored them for half an hour but they just stay there. They have lots of shelter which they will not use and just want to come in. Iv one acre which iv fenced into four plots to do grazing rotation although they can roam freely the whole area and was going to start rotaion when they are bigger and the youngest is weaned. How do i get them to move out? Should i just leave them by back door and hope starvation drives them to move to the grass?
They are cameroon lambs, two are reddish brown but last one is brown/white and black with small bumps no horns to see. I know cameroon can have white markings but my vet is convinced he is a cross! Although she also insistes i feed them rabbit food and should feed milk as much as they will drink, both the latter i know are completely wrong, so think last one being a cross is wrong also. Any thoughts?

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1 week 4 days ago #546082 by Anakei

No idea about the re-homing but glad to hear they have all survived! :lol:


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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1 week 4 days ago #546083 by Si

No dont want to rehome, just live outside like sheep:-)

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1 week 4 days ago #546086 by Stikkibeek

You are only experiencing what thousands of parents do when they want their teenagers to leave home. :whistle:
I'd fence them away from the house and get them used to eating their hay and pellets outdoors.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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1 week 4 days ago #546088 by Si

If it was human teenager id either change locks or move. but these are much more special :-)

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1 week 4 days ago #546091 by Kilmoon

LOL, I was just thinking this morning as to how yours were all doing.

They're just running home for comfort when it rains. When you say shelter is that trees/shrubbery or a large shed type shelter? If its a large shed type you could make it like their bedroom with comfort blankets etc and feed them all their food there from now on. Basically shift their focus to a new bedroom and comfort rather than the kitchen door.

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1 week 4 days ago #546092 by Si

yep they are all doing well, and only buxton is still on meds for his heart he is now 13k . They have a shed with hay and blanket ,connected to top two plots, house plot has a seating area with sofa on one side and hay store on other, then down the bottom plot has a small poly tunnel, and will build a wooden shelter later. Even though im surrounded by woods i only have one large tree on my bit but have planted 10 trees plus hedging which iv fenced round. Tonight was mayhem as indoors all day so loads of beans. 3 lambs one dog and me stopping play getting too mad for Smudge (three weeks old) even though he is holding his own quite well
Supose iv just got to be harsh, but when they get spooked jiust want me or Archie for comforr. For their first night out, slhould i shut them in shed or let them have free run?

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1 week 4 days ago #546095 by Kilmoon

As it's just them, then yes I'd shut them in a shed at night to keep them safe and contained until they get used to the new regime/bedroom.

If you feed their hay and nuts (and even the bottle for Buxton and Smudge) in that shed over the next week or so (or whenever you decide 'moving out' day will be, ie until Smudge is big enough to hold his own with older brothers unsupervised) then they'll associate it with food/comfort. Basically, get them used to enjoying their new space during the day as a safe enclosed area and once used to that then lock them in whilst your out during the day, and then gradually make that overnight. You could feed them in the shed, lock it whilst they're eating, then go back an hour later and let them out.....that way they know they will be let out at some stage and won't panic too much.

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1 week 3 days ago #546104 by LongRidge

If there are sheep predators where you live, then you might want to put the dog outside at night too.

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1 week 3 days ago #546105 by Si

Iv just learnt of some sort of pine martin here but cant get info at the mow ( 2-3 feet long). Iv been told this mustelid will eat lamb but until i know exactly what im dealing with will not put out at night as gates on shed have mesh 10 x 5 cm wide, foxes wont eat 13 - 20 k lambs and no wolves in my area. Only wild pigs and deer. My dog would have a heart attack if i put him out at night, he is a badly treated rescue and would feel iv abandonded him, dont realy want to get a LSG.

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1 week 3 days ago #546107 by Cigar

When we get new calves we lock them into the calf shelter for the first night, after that they have used it every night with no further intervention. It might take a few more nights to sort out your older lambs but they should learn.

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1 week 3 days ago #546116 by LongRidge

You would be surprised at what a 15 kg canine can do to a 25 kg or larger lamb. Two of our sheep dog pups escaped into the pet lamb paddock one day, and decided that they wanted to learn how to catch sheep. Blue 9 got his back and neck ripped, and really should have been put down because of his injuries. It took a lot of tape, topical antibiotics, fly protection, skin salve, and time to save him :-(. One of my farmer friend had a sheep dog that trained itself to push adult sheep into a fence and then lean on them until the farmer had caught the sheep.

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1 week 2 days ago #546134 by Si

Had a break through! After 4 hours indoors (because it was raining and my divas did NOT want to get wet) I was sitting outside on my sofa under the roof, enjoying the peace of the evening, normaly joining me on the sofa are Smudge and buxton while Henry rubs his fur against the wall. Tonight my brave soilders by their own accord went onto the grass and grazed for 45 min in the drizzle, unti Henri spoiled it by nibbling on a photinia (which was fenced off). One small step for sheep one giant leap for divas in bokrači :-)

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