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Topic-icon How long does my gorse problem go on for

  • Posts: 186
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1 week 5 days ago #546065 by neil postie

Hi again, I have several paddocks that gorse has been cleared from and now have 1000's of baby gorse coming up which I am dealing with by spot spraying. I know gorse seeds last longer than I will but I was wondering if the numbers coming up will tapper o
ff over a short period of time or will I have the same number of seedlings for the next forever.

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1 week 5 days ago #546066 by Kilmoon

Basically, if you had gorse, you will always have gorse as the seed bank will outlast your lifetime.

Keep spraying in autumn or spring with something like Brushkiller to leave the grasses alone, but realise that goats and sheep enjoy the fresh regrowth in spring. Our sheep will tuck into gorse seedlings at any time and absolutely go nuts over the flowers. We tend to spray as soon as they leave a paddock - we've been fighting gorse on this property since 1970 - and there are no mature plants left, but seedlings come up each spring with some summers being the right conditions for massive growth and other summers not much grows. We take the philosophy that every new seedling is one less gorse seed in the ground for later.

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1 week 5 days ago #546068 by neil postie

thanks Kilmoon, i was hoping that if we get say 50% of available seeds germinating each year there would be a quick drop off in numbers. I also use tordon brushkiller, about every 2 to 3 months I do a spray. FYI in the UK a building burnt down, as part of the demolition they removed a concrete slab and gorse seeds that had been under it sprouted. The building was 200 years old!

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1 week 4 days ago #546076 by LongRidge

With our soil, when we fertilise for pasture the pasture smothers out the gorse. Gorse, and clover, is a symptom of soil that is too low in nitrogen for grasses to grow well. Gorse without much clover is a symptom of too little sulphate for good clover growth. When the soil has adequate and correct mineral composition for good grass growth the animals eat more of it, and in doing so will eat the gorse seedlings that might have come up in the now imperfect fertility for gorse, but correct for pasture.
With our soil, controlling the weeds without changing the soil conditions for the plant that you want to grow is a waste of time. To control weeds like gorse and broom I fertilise the soil before removing the weeds.
Another advantage of fertilising for pasture is that the pastures recover faster after heat or cold stress, which gives the gorse less opportunity to get away.

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1 week 4 days ago #546085 by Stikkibeek

Well they say 1 years seeding 7 years weeding, so multiply 7 by the number of years the grass has been growing and you might get an idea!

Brush killer spray is great. do take precautions using it and the safety blurb ought to be on the container. it's money well spent and does not affect most other things like grass and hedgerows. it's excellent on blackberry too. Sprayed all ours a few months ago and the blackberry has almost disappeared and the gorse is now looking dead.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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