Japanese Fodder Willow

More
5 years 5 months ago #544013 by AGPS
Japanese Fodder Willow was created by AGPS
I have an area of approx 1000m2 on my block that will be fenced off and planted Japanese Fodder Willow.

Ideally it would be used as a grazing block for about 12 to 15 sheep in times of grass shortage.

Does anyone have any experience with this...is it best to plant 1.0 to 1.5 metre poles and if so at what spacings?

The block is approx 40m x 25m and is slightly sloping with a NE aspect.

Am I on the right track or there other options I should consider?

I'm located in South Waikato.

Thanks in advance B) :lol:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544021 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
I have planted this willow, i didnt have a block so dont know spacing but my question would be what you are wanting to use it for.
Although its called fodder willow, ii couldnt get a single animal to eat it.
Are you planting it for stock feed?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544024 by AGPS
Replied by AGPS on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Thanks Muri,

Ideally I would like to use the Willow as supplementary feed during times of feed shortage.

What prompted me was recently we had a big blow here and a neighbour has a Poplar planted about five metres away from one of my boundary fences (The Poplar is about 20 metres high) anyway it dropped a branch about three metres long into my property (No damage to the fence thankfully) where I had ten Wiltshire Ewes grazing...they have plenty of feed, but before I could get outside to move the branch they had stripped all of the leaves off it.

So I thought if they were that keen to eat Poplar they might be interested in Willow as well.
Obviously I don't want any fodder tree to get to any real height so the Japanese Fodder Willow seemed to meet the brief.

I would appreciate any advice or ideas that may assist making the right decision. :) :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544025 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
I have feed shortage in winter as well as in summer, so I have a few tree lucerne, aka tagasaste, which is ever-green and a legume. It prefers a dry site, and does not grow very big when mature, does not leave leaves everywhere in autumn, does not last much longer than ten years, and provides flowers in spring for kereru. But like the willow it will need to be protected from the animals while it is growing until it is tall enough.
If you use willows or poplars check that they have not been modified to not taste good to possums. For about the last 30 years poplars and perhaps some varieties of willow have been made to not taste good to possums, and they teand to not be liked by other animals. Also, remember that willows contain the active ingredient of aspirin, so might cause your animals to bleed more than they otherwise would if they got an injury or bruise.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544026 by tonybaker
Replied by tonybaker on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
I use tagasaste as well for Wiltshires. It will grow quite big if not pruned and can get borer after many years, but I think it is the cheapest and easiest stock feed, apart from grass. It makes good firewood too.
Wiltshires and Dorpers do not like a grass only diet. They need roughage and will eat anything that they can reach. Mine have learned to work as a team to get to oak leaves by using each others backs as a ladder!!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544027 by AGPS
Replied by AGPS on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Some good information there, Thanks Longridge and Tony.

I did research Tagasaste as well but Mr Google didn't offer up any suppliers of Poles, only root trainers.

Poles would be my preference and if fitted with tree guards once established I could graze the sheep around them as the area in question does produce a reasonable amount of feed so it would need to be kept under control until the trees came into production.

Did you start with root trainers or were you able to source Poles...if you used Poles can you recall where you purchased them from?

Do you have them as random plantings or block plantings?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544029 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Tree lucerne is not really a tree despite its name. Its a short lived plant though. It is grown from seed and you would have to fence off an area where you planted them.
Poplars can be kept low and probably are the best of all the feeds, not only because all stock will eat it, but also because they are high in zinc and other minerals so great in areas with FE. I just used to drop big trees direct into the paddock and the sheep and cattle would eat all the green. Its really very nutritional.
I have seen various studies looking at the nutritional value of various trees in terms of feeding to stock. Cant remember the outcome though of the research

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544034 by tonybaker
Replied by tonybaker on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
well Longridge - you are correct, Tag is a legume. I have had Tagasaste on my property since 1986 and they are still going strong! Despite having limbs hacked off and prunings taken for the sheep, they continue to produce.
Plants are readily obtainable in root trainers from nurserymen, just check online. After a few seasons seed pods develop which can be propagated, or will self seed readily. For me, they have been the perfect windbreak/feed option. Read this article

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544037 by Mudlerk
Replied by Mudlerk on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
If your sheep are anything like mine, don't put too much faith in tree guards. I've given up on them and just fence off any blocks of trees for 3 or 4 years. The main downside I've encountered for the latter method is midsummer hay fever, when the grass seeds. You shouldn't need to 'release' willows, though: they'd soon overtop the grass.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544040 by AGPS
Replied by AGPS on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Given that Tagasaste is started with seed/root trainers how is plant protection managed, i.e. Rabbits etc

With Japanese Fodder Willows being available as Poles, using tree sleeves does give them some protection from rodents and I imagine would allow the area to be grazed earlier than if planting Tagasaste?

Are growth rates similar irrespective of which option you use?

There are obviously initial cost benefits in planting Tagasaste as opposed to Fodder Willow but are there strike rate differences, what percentage losses should one expect?

There seems to be very little information available in regards to ideal plant spacings as a grazing block...can anyone shed any light on this?
I gather that tight spacings would also have a bearing on overall height and width of the trees?

I guess I could plant a mixture of both but my key criteria are, simple establishment, limited ongoing management, a quick return to be able to use the land for grazing and financial considerations - not looking for cheap but best value for the dollars spent.

There seems to be lots of information available on line but a lot of it is just coverage in general terms and lacks specifics, this is where the help from this forum from users with real life experience is invaluable...Thanks, keep it coming as I'm sure that I'm not the only one interested in moving towards considering alternative food sources for stock. B)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544046 by tonybaker
Replied by tonybaker on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
I got a neighbour to rip a few lines to make it easier to plant. He just used a mole plough but a winged ripper is best if you can get hold of one. Then I consolidated the rip with the tractor wheel and opened a 15cm hole with a hole borer. Watering in is the key, I also used mycorrhiza inoculant to soak the plants in before setting them out.
There are numerous nurseries selling Tag, like this one
I did not use rabbit repellant but it's better if you can. You may be able to get free vine guards from a grape grower, they are not expensive anyway. Make sure you use a bamboo cane to hold the guard up. I sprayed around the planting site with Guardoprim, but prespraying is good with glyphosate.
Whatever you do, do it soon or it will be too late in the season.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
The following user(s) said Thank You: AGPS

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544055 by AGPS
Replied by AGPS on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Thanks Tony for the detailed response...much appreciated.

Most of the replies so far relate to Tagasaste so I'm wondering if there is a reason why it was chosen as opposed to Japanese Fodder willow? B) :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 5 months ago #544057 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Japanese Fodder Willow
Sheep and cattle need fodder with protein in it, and most trees do not have much protein in their leaves and bark. Tagasaste does so it is a little more balanced by those animals than are willows and poplar. Tagasaste also like dry and very dry sites, whereas willow tends to stop growing when the soil gets dry, and will drop it's leaves in a drought, so perhaps not as useful as drought fodder. Remember that ground under trees tends to make the pasture less nutritious because the deeper roots of trees remove more chemical elements, and trees like a fungal soil, pasture a bacterial soil. Willows also have more aspirin, which can be not good in excess.
When planting poles I have used a handheld post hold borer (either human or engine powered, to get a deep hole that is snug.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.170 seconds