M. Bovis - some interesting discussions

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5 years 9 months ago #540447 by Kilmoon
Try this
www.interest.co.nz/rural-news/94325/keit...-new-zealand-crucial

Then listen to this.....and they think they can stop it?!
www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ch...-on-mycoplasma-bovis

If she's right (listen towards the end when she talks about what happened to the bulls)....then there are disease carrying bulls out there that aren't being traced.
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5 years 9 months ago #540450 by max2
Touching on the subject of multiple young(er) calf deaths, during the 2016 season local talk was several larger rearing units had also lost up to 50% at any given time with no diagnosis from the vets up this way.

People put it down to ''something they must have picked up at the yards'' but IMO I think this is an over used excuse for when there is no obvious cause.

I personally believe that MP. Bovis is more widespread than currently being acknowledged publicly.

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5 years 9 months ago - 5 years 9 months ago #540457 by cowvet
We also run the risk of M bovis being an overused retrospective “diagnosis” to explain a disaster.

I do not like large scale calf rearing units. In general they are not fussy on calves coming in , have poor colostrum intake history, and are put into a high density stocking rate, and with often a challenging feed/low input system. When things go wrong in a high density stressed neonate rearing system then they go wrong in a big big way! I have seen this happen when it most certainly hasn’t been Mbovis so for someone to say 2 years after the fact that the South Canterbury calf rearin unit “most certainly” had it is also a Long bow to draw .

Many people keeping stating how they think it’s much more widespread and has been here for ages. I don’t agree. It may be, but at the present time all positive cases san be traced back to origin and the timeline of entry has been narrowed down.
All NZ dairy farms have had their bulk milk tested.... if it had been here longer and was more widespread then this should have thrown up some unexplained links. The calves from the calf rearing property will be going through the works so by default will be under surveillance.
There will probably be positives hanging out on dry stock properties - but continued surveillance at slaughter plants and dairy milk vats will identify them.
Time will tell but at this stage I think it’s relatively well contained and if we have any hope of getting rid Of it then now is our only chance.


I love animals...they're delicious
Last edit: 5 years 9 months ago by cowvet.

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5 years 9 months ago #540458 by Ruth
What is the works surveillance likely to involve? Will they pick up arthritis cases and pneumonia and test for M.bovis? That would be very sensible! We'd want them to track all farms from which unknown infected stock had come.

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5 years 9 months ago - 5 years 9 months ago #540465 by cowvet
From what I’ve heard they have done quite a bit of testing at slaughter from a feedlot that sources cattle from hundreds of farms around the South Island. PCR swabs from tonsillar tissue.

Don’t get much diseased stock through the works so a lot of surveillance is reliant of farmers calling vets to see sick animals
Many vets are sampling diseased animals in everyday life. I’ve tested bull beef with joint infections etc. anything a bit unusual can be called in to MPI and we’re probably sampling anything a bit odd way as a result of this.
All mastitis samples submitted to the animal health labs since June last year have been tested for Mycoplasma.

Hugely reliant on tracing movements and this is much easier and faster if farmers are NAIT compliant.


I love animals...they're delicious
Last edit: 5 years 9 months ago by cowvet.

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5 years 9 months ago #540470 by Ruth
Thanks, I had forgotten the tonsil swabbing I'd also heard about on the radio.

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5 years 9 months ago #540471 by Wren

cowvet wrote: I do not like large scale calf rearing units. In general they are not fussy on calves coming in , have poor colostrum intake history, and are put into a high density stocking rate, and with often a challenging feed/low input system. When things go wrong in a high density stressed neonate rearing system then they go wrong in a big big way!


I listened to the episode of Insight at the weekend, and to be honest I was quite surprised that an acceptable base death rate for the calf rearing operation was 8% - we don't have cattle so I don't know what is expected, but that seems pretty high to me even before they started talking about the M. bovis deaths...

Muddling our way through 1Ha on the Christchurch Port Hills, with flocks of heritage chickens, Silver Appleyard ducks, Gotland sheep, and Arapawa goats.

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5 years 9 months ago - 5 years 9 months ago #540472 by Ruth
I thought that too. On that many calves - was it 3000 in a season? - that would be 240 calves. That's a lot of little lives to let slip! In my herd that would be like losing three calves in a year and I've only ever hit two and those were bad years and birth accidents of various kinds.
Last edit: 5 years 9 months ago by Ruth.

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5 years 9 months ago #540476 by max2
I hit 8% loss each season and I'm not a big rearing facility and yes I would like it to be lower too. I was also part of the colostrum survey two years ago where it was determined that calves that were tested at the sales yards had (overall) insufficient colostrum intake.

Last year I bought privately from a farmer who I know gives his calves their full measure of colostrum and doesn't let them leave early. I had the same % of loss as previous years.

My vets are regular visitors during the season and involved in what I do, checking out the housing etc so I know I am doing it right in that area. If they are here for a cow I will get them to look over anything in the sick pen. Last year I also bought for the first time a very expensive blend of electrolyte type product that was aimed at stock with roto and ?? (will have to check label again in shed, it has been nearly a year) not sure if that assisted or not in saving a life but what I do know is it breaks my heart to lose every single one of them.

Its frustrating as a rearer when everything that could be done has been done and even the vets don't know why. I have had a few opened up to check on organs etc and all appear normal.

Very frustrating.

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5 years 9 months ago #540505 by Mudlerk
Perhaps the answer lies in our cows' genes? When you start selecting hard for a few characteristics [like amount of milk], you often lose some important other ones: look at the appalling fertility of thoroughbred horses!

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5 years 9 months ago - 5 years 9 months ago #540507 by Stikkibeek
On a follow-up from the original links that Kilmoon posted, it's clear that Susan McEwan was right in her belief that the deaths she witnessed in all those calves, indeed had M. Bovis. What gets me is the lies told by Grazcare in regard to the live calves moved off her property. it was reported that they had all gone to slaughter, yet now we know they or some of them, now 2yos, were shifted to another farm and

Since then she had been contacted by the Ministry for Primary Industries and had discovered calves from that year were sent to a farm which had just been declared to be an infected property.

In fact 95 percent of the now 2-year-old bulls sent there from her place in 2016 were found to be infected with the disease.

Where did the rest of them really go?

This shocking alleged misrepresentation by Grazcare, has condemned yet another farmer to the loss of his livelihood by contaminating his farm.

Confirmation

It appears that there will be no "loss of income compensation" for Susan, yet Grazcare will be compensated. Something very unjust about this. not only did she lose her farm, her livelihood and run up huge vet bills, but her self esteem has taken a huge hit with her emotional and mental wellbeing under threat.
Injustice like this really gets to me.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last edit: 5 years 9 months ago by Stikkibeek.
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5 years 9 months ago #540510 by Muz1
Grazcare comment they don't know if the 216 calves moved on were from them. This is where the ability to trace animals plays a role. Did they not follow compliance?

Everything Must be Somewhere

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5 years 9 months ago #540511 by Stikkibeek
This from their own front page.

Be it younger animals during critical growth phases or older stock maintaining weight over winter, thanks to our work you can be assured diligent monitoring and focused care will provide peak weight and productivity.


Hope their company is scrutinized.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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5 years 9 months ago #540512 by Kilmoon
If large companies are thumbing their nose at compliance with NAIT (either deliberately or though employee carelessness) it makes you wonder about the lifestyler who wants a couple of calves for the kids to grow. What incentive has there really been for them to be part of the scheme? How many potentially infected animals (carriers) are out there on lifestyle blocks?

I think come spring when they reassess....they'll throw their collective hands in the air, and tell everyone to learn to live with it....because they'll realise that horse bolted years beforehand when it came in. (I hope to be pleasantly surprised, but life has taught me to plan for the worst case scenario and go from there.)

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5 years 9 months ago #540513 by Stikkibeek
I believe that NAIT needs to be forward as well as backwards tracing. For instance, most of our stock I can trace back to where they came from, but if I sell on to someone else, I no longer get access to what has become of it after the first transaction. If the beast is something one has bred, it would be nice to know it is still alive.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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