Log in

Register



Topic-icon Best cat for mouse/rat control

  • Posts: 23
  • Thank you received: 0
11 months 2 weeks ago #539252 by Song

We have been having a lot of rodent problem in our house! Tried all sorts of poison and trap. Trapped a few but still activities around ie poos everywhere.

Thinking of getting a cat to help :( we are not used to cat or dog in fact. So we really new to this but we are desperate. Any particular breed is good? We need it to be good! Desperate.

Thank you so much.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 9263
  • Thank you received: 308
11 months 2 weeks ago #539253 by Ruth

How have you been poisoning them? If it has not been successful, you probably haven't done it correctly or perhaps for long enough.
You will always have rats around at times, because they'll continue to come to your larder from 'out there'. Cats are unreliable ratters. Some individuals are apparently good at it, others won't touch rats and some are simply scared of them. Rats defend themselves in a fairly frightening manner.

So what bait/toxin have you used and how have you used it?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 120
  • Thank you received: 21
11 months 3 weeks ago #539254 by iSor

From our experience, our Maine Coon is excellent at catching mice and the occasional rat (along with birds and rabbits), often bringing them back alive inside the house. Unfortunately this behaviour only adds to our rodent problem because at any given time we don’t know if he has brought a mouse or rat into the house only to let it go free while we weren’t looking, were out or were asleep.

A better alternative, if you are not used to cats or dogs, is to set mouse traps laced with peanut butter around the house and you just need to remember to check them regularly. Also, we put those blue poison baits up in the roof cavity and in various places around the house such as the cupboard next to the dishwasher, because it’s warm there, hot water cupboard, under the fridge and pantry etc.

Don’t get a cat unless you love them unconditionally, because at times you may also be woken up in the middle of the night when they want to show you their rat which they then let go and is running around in the bedroom.

Last Edit: 11 months 3 weeks ago by iSor.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Born2Fight

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 805
  • Thank you received: 63
11 months 3 weeks ago #539255 by Anakei

In my experience the best ratters I have had, have been adopted from half feral parents. They don't make very good pets (don't sit on your lap, and scratch when "playing" ) but were excellent ratters. The 2 I have now are town cats whose mother was a lap cat and they don't bother to hunt at all. My theory is if they survived in the wild they must have come from good hunting stock.

I second the poison, but make sure you put it in bait traps.otherwise rodents will take bait back to the nest and store it, without ingesting it. Keep replacing the bait and then one day the bait will still be there and then you will know you are on top of the problem. Refresh the bait now and again so any incomers will take it. I had to put bait out every day for 4 weeks before I got control of the rats in the hen house. I am now baiting again as I have noticed half eaten eggs so think they have come in for the winter.


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 587
  • Thank you received: 42
11 months 3 weeks ago #539257 by Furball

Don't get a cat! As others have said, cats are not reliable for rodent control and are likely to kill birds, native skinks and native insects. Also, even if your cat does go after rats a large rat can do serious damage to a cat, which will mean anguish for you as an owner and also vet bills. That's not even considering the cost of cat food, neutering/spaying, kitty litter, and vet bills for all the other illnesses cats get, or for car accidents. Cats are not a cheap method of rodent control.

Go and get some proper bait stations (the black plastic ones that have a wire inside and that lock closed) and some bait which has a hole through each bait piece. The chocolate flavour "pestoff" bait is good. You can get this from Mitre 10, Farmlands or RD1. Fill the bait stations, using gloves to place the bait on the wire. Place one bait station in the attic. Place one bait station alongside the wall of your house in an area that has cover, such as under a bush - rodents like to run along walls - or if your house is raised, place a bait station under the house. If you have a large property with outbuildings, place one bait station in or by each shed, outhouse or greenhouse that you have. If you keep animals or have a compost bin, place a bait station near the compost bin or near the place the animal food is kept.

Write on the calendar when you put the stations out. After two weeks, check them, and replace any missing bait. Bait takes time to kill the rats so it is pointless to put new bait out every day at the beginning, as rats which are "walking dead" will still keep eating your expensive bait for many days until they die. After another 2 weeks, check and replace bait again. After this, check the bait stations once a month and replace any missing bait. If the bait becomes soggy or has slugs on it, remove the old bait carefully and place it in a plastic bag and tie it shut and place in the rubbish. Replace with fresh bait. If you refresh the stations regularly once a month you will no longer have a rodent problem.

Last Edit: 11 months 3 weeks ago by Furball.
The following user(s) said Thank You: tahunakuaka

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1
  • Thank you received: 0
11 months 3 weeks ago #539258 by Born2Fight

No matter what rodent you are dealing with, chances are you can take matters into your own hands. Consider the size of the rodent when choosing elimination methods. Snap traps that would kill a mouse will often only wound a rat or squirrel, and then you risk having the animal drag the trap into an inaccessible area of your house. Worse yet, you may have to put a trapped rodent out of its suffering, and that is not a pleasant activity. Live traps are not advised for rodents. Rodents have excellent memories, and they will often return to an area that has been noted as a viable food source or warm form of shelter.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 9263
  • Thank you received: 308
11 months 3 weeks ago #539259 by Ruth

Squirrels? Where are you?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 9646
  • Thank you received: 435
11 months 3 weeks ago #539263 by Stikkibeek

Welcome to the LSB. You must surely be an International newby. (We don't have squirrels in NZ) Love to hear a little about the area you live


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 5184
  • Thank you received: 114
11 months 3 weeks ago #539264 by Ronney

Song, there is no breed of cat that is going to be specifically good at rodent catching. It just doesn't work that way. I've owned over 40 cats in my lifetime (and I can give you the names of every one of them), none of them were breeds, all of them were/are what are termed Alley Cats. Most of them would mouse/rat but only one took the prize - a black cat with beautiful, big green eyes that lived with our pigs for over a year before venturing up to the house - ergo half feral. I suspect he'd been dumped and we inherited him. Mice, rats, stoats, eels, pheasants and once a morepork:( He was the exception rather than the rule and I suspect it was largely due to his beginnings.

However, I'm reading that you are suffering from mice/whatever inside the house? In which case a cat is not a stupid idea. If you have never owned a cat you may well find that you will enjoy them and they will go a long way to keeping your home vermin free.

I keep bait stations at the cowshed where rats can become a very real problem - the cats deal with anything around the home. Read into that what you will.

Cheers,
Ronnie

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 549
  • Thank you received: 77
11 months 2 weeks ago #539266 by Mudlerk

Once owned a cat that cleared out all the skinks, birds, even rabbits anywhere near our 5 acres...even then she couldn't cope with the mouse/rat problem. I agree with everyone else who thinks cats are a poor method of rodent control...their real expertise seems to be birdlife!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 3275
  • Thank you received: 131
11 months 2 weeks ago #539277 by Hawkspur

A friend has a moggy that brings in a rat or more every night. She has been trained by the cat to kill them after it releases them in her bedroom.:whistle: It is of indeterminate breeding.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 14220
  • Thank you received: 407
11 months 2 weeks ago #539278 by LongRidge

When using those blue balls of poison, crush one up and put it on a saucer or suchlike. That way they don't take the whole thing away. When using poison, always, as in always, put down a bowl of water near the poison. Eating poison makes them thirsty, so they then gnaw the water pipes in the ceiling cavity, which is not fun to repair :-(. We had one or a family of rodents gnaw the same pipe three times before we finally got rid of it or them :-(. Dead rodents tend to find somewhere warm to die, so can stink for a few days. In the cavities of a dishwasher, fridge or oven are favorite places, but watch out for the ones that hide in the pop-up toaster. Roast mouse flavoured toast is definitely an acquired culinary delight :-).

The following user(s) said Thank You: tahunakuaka

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 120
  • Thank you received: 21
11 months 2 weeks ago #539280 by iSor

Yes, we learnt to crush the baits up after we could hear the rat rolling them around in the ceiling cavity between the two storeys, but the problem was getting bait into the cavity. The only access was through downlights pulled out then re-positioned after the crushed bait went in next to the hole.

We figured out that the rats were getting into that level via a feijoa tree which had grown right up to the gutter of the carport adjacent to the bottom storey of the house, so that there were probably feijoas stored in the cavity as well. After the activity stopped, the smell of the dead rat soon wafted out through the downlights below and we tried not to have visitors for a week because the stench was a bit embarassing.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1984
  • Thank you received: 47
11 months 2 weeks ago #539283 by 4trees

We use the Pest Off baits, which have hole in the middle, we get a long nail, piece of wood and nail the bait to the wood, they have to just chew away without taking the whole bait. Rats will take traps away unless they are nailed onto a heavy piece of wood. Our rats are biggish and they tend to cart the poison away if they can, they store it and don't always eat it so that was when we went to the nail on the wood. The other thing is you can put the bait up high out of children or pets road when there is a piece of wood, or it is nailed down. Good luck they have just started coming in in the last couple of weeks. Cheers and good luck.


Cheers
http:treeandshrub.co.nz

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 805
  • Thank you received: 63
11 months 2 weeks ago #539286 by Anakei

I ALWAYS use the black bait stations after the dog got into a home made one and ate the bait. Luckily I found the nail and piece of wood and spotted the bright green poo :sick: so I got him to the vet on time. It was too late to make him vomit (not the vet) so he went on vitamin K for a month. It could have been a lot worse!


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.099 seconds
Go to top

Sign up for my monthly newsletter!

Get all the latest news along with practical tips and expert advice.