Maggoty feet

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6 years 4 months ago #536843 by kate28
Maggoty feet was created by kate28
Our hoggett weather has always had bad feet/knees from a young age. He has had several lots of antibiotics with very little improvement, has had several feet trims in the past, zinc baths. Today we noticed he was much more lame than usual, very reluctant to walk and on inspection he had tiny maggots between the hooves of all 4 feet which were a bit pussy & pink. It didnt have the typical foot rot smell and our land is currently very dry. The hooves themselves didnt feel very soft. Hooves werent over grown but we gave a small trim & sprayed with foot rot spray. Would this be foot rot? If not what other possibilities could the current issue be & what treatments could we try?

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6 years 4 months ago #536844 by Kilmoon
Replied by Kilmoon on topic Maggoty feet
There is one thing that you could try that would solve the problem permanently......lead poisoning, aka a bullet.

Sorry, but such ongoing issues will never resolve themselves no matter how many antibiotics etc that you throw at it, time to say goodbye for his welfare.

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6 years 4 months ago #536846 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Maggoty feet
Maggots in the feet are an indication that there is scald or footrot present. The treatment of these is the same but the bugs are different. The good thing about maggots is that they eat the rot so that it does not stink so much. In previous times maggots were used extensively to clean wounds in humans, are are still used in some hospitals in NZ to clear gangrene.
The footrot spray will kill the maggots, but the hoof will still need to be trimmed to open the wound to the air.
As stated, euthanasia is a very good idea.

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6 years 4 months ago #536847 by kate28
Replied by kate28 on topic Maggoty feet
The only reason he is still around is that he is a bottle fed baby & my mother who lives with us is very fond of him. He was one of two hand raised babies that year & the two are normally together. We thought he had joint ill as a baby which I didnt realise back then starts from the navel. Since then it has seemed to be either joints or feet & at times we havnt been sure which. If it was just any sheep in the paddock, he would have been shot a long time ago but for the reason he is a pet we have persisted. We will try & tackle this current foot rot issue and see if his symptoms can be reduced and then reassess. Might have to have a realistic chat with the Mother also. I am thinking you are probably right that it is foot rot & the reason it dosnt stink is the maggots.

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6 years 4 months ago - 6 years 4 months ago #536848 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Maggoty feet
We had trouble all winter with the hooves of one of our goats, finally resulting in her slipping triplets 6 weeks before she was due to kid. We tried footrot spray, purple and blue spray, copper foot baths and zinc, but nothing was effective in dealing with the recurrence. Our vet put us on to kopertox, a spray on treatment that has several ingredients including kerosene. One treatment was all it took. She has not returned to any sort of lameness and is stacking on the weight she lost during her months of foot rot. It is not cheap to buy kopertox, but it is well worth a try Kopertox
We bought ours from Profarm, so it should be available through other farm outlets like RD1 or Farmlands

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last edit: 6 years 4 months ago by Stikkibeek.

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6 years 4 months ago - 6 years 4 months ago #536849 by Mudlerk
Replied by Mudlerk on topic Maggoty feet
Well past foot rot...contact your vet and have him put down! You have an obligation under law to relieve animal suffering, and this poor fellow sounds like a perpetual sufferer.
Last edit: 6 years 4 months ago by Mudlerk.

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6 years 4 months ago #536850 by Muz1
Replied by Muz1 on topic Maggoty feet
Keep an eye on the belly and sides for fly as the feet can pass odour to the fleece that attracts flies

Everything Must be Somewhere

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6 years 4 months ago #536851 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Maggoty feet
Ummm, ummm, ummm. I like to think a little differently. If a pain becomes part of normal life, then it becomes a part of life, so is not worth dying for. About a year ago I caught Bells Palsy, which is rather a stupid thing to do, and was put onto betnovate steroid for a week. The steroid not only cured the palsy, but also cured everything else that was causing and has caused pain all my life ..... except the type 1 diabetes, but even then the hugely excessive blood glucose that steroid causes had none of the side effects. For the first time ever I found out what it was like to be "normal". Unfortunately I had to go back to my normal :-(.
So I like to think that if you are doing enough to relieve pain in animals, and bring them back to their "normal", then there is no need for euthanasia.
Also for the welfare of the whole herd, I like to have one or two animals that are more prone to a problem than the rest of the herd. So for bloat in cattle I like to have one animal that bloats first, for footrot in sheep and goats the same, catches worms more easily the same, etc.

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6 years 4 months ago #536870 by Ronney
Replied by Ronney on topic Maggoty feet
Kate, I had a sheep very much like yours. Started life with Joint Ill which was treated at the time and for 9 months or so she was fine. Then started the lameness and often I was unable to tell if it was joint related or foot related. I'd bring her in and sometimes her feet would have little maggots in them such as you describe but the horn would be hard and healthy with no overgrowth, no smell etc. I'd spray the feet, let her go and she'd be fine for several months. Other times it seemed to be the joint on her front leg and no sign of foot problems. In exasperation I filled her up with LA300, once every 48hours for 3 days, and over a year later she went in the freezer without having any further trouble.

Mudlerk, Kate is not being irresponsible - the vet has been involved, she's asking questions and she's learning. I wouldn't be knocking it on the head either without giving it my best shot first.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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6 years 4 months ago #536878 by kate28
Replied by kate28 on topic Maggoty feet
Thanks everyone for all the suggestions & advice. Barry and the flock were all shorn yesterday so there isnt any risk or transferring maggots to the fleece & was glad to find no fly strike present anywhere else. Barry is looking happier after being shorn as I imagine the heat wasnt making him feel nice either. He is walking a little better today but I am quite keen to get hold of some of the Koportox mentioned & give that a try. It is very much like what Ronny has described - the hoof itself is hard & not overgrown,its really only the inside side walls between the two hooves which are a little pink & slightly soft.
He has not been constantly suffering. It is also like what Ronny said, he gets a bit better for a few months & then another issue shows up. During the few months he is ok, he might have a very slight lameness but he is happy, eating well, maintaining good body condition & keeps up with the flock. When he gets bad again, he will spend more time sitting down & isnt as good at keeping up with everyone else but still has a good body condition.

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6 years 4 months ago #536879 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Maggoty feet
I have some sheep, and lots of Boer goats, that are very tight between the toes. so that gunk easily gets caught, and is very difficult for the animal to get out. I trim the insides of the soles so that it is easier for the air to get in and the gunk to get out. Take it off in small slivers.

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6 years 4 months ago #536886 by cowvet
Replied by cowvet on topic Maggoty feet

kate28 wrote: Thanks everyone for all the suggestions & advice. Barry and the flock were all shorn yesterday so there isnt any risk or transferring maggots to the fleece & was glad to find no fly strike present anywhere else. Barry is looking happier after being shorn as I imagine the heat wasnt making him feel nice either. He is walking a little better today but I am quite keen to get hold of some of the Koportox mentioned & give that a try. It is very much like what Ronny has described - the hoof itself is hard & not overgrown,its really only the inside side walls between the two hooves which are a little pink & slightly soft.
He has not been constantly suffering. It is also like what Ronny said, he gets a bit better for a few months & then another issue shows up. During the few months he is ok, he might have a very slight lameness but he is happy, eating well, maintaining good body condition & keeps up with the flock. When he gets bad again, he will spend more time sitting down & isnt as good at keeping up with everyone else but still has a good body condition.


You could very well be dealing with chronic foot rot. If that’s the case then more animals could get infected unless you get some good advice and take action on an eradication program


I love animals...they're delicious

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