Pyroclassic... yay or nay??

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6 years 10 months ago #534043 by chocfish
We are in the market for a new woodburner... really like the look of the pyroclassic IV...however it seems to get mixed reviews on the forums!
We need something to heat the house, with a wetback. Burning a mix of soft and hard woods.
Any advice?? What do you have??
Tia

Crazy revolving door of dogs ponies and kids. ….

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6 years 10 months ago #534046 by kate
Replied by kate on topic Pyroclassic... yay or nay??
I've never had a Pyroclassic but I would recommend any Firenzo woodburner. I've loved both of mine and I've never heard a bad word said about them...

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6 years 10 months ago #534056 by Stikkibeek
Our hot water has just boiled over. We have a Metro wee ped and it is extremely efficient. I'd recommend you also look at them.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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6 years 10 months ago #534068 by Mudlerk
Replied by Mudlerk on topic Pyroclassic... yay or nay??
I'm a Metro fan, too. It was the brand that set off the revolution that makes most modern burners so superior to the old Kent-style/Jotul ones...something to do with thicker steel, I think.
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6 years 10 months ago #534247 by barabrae
Pyro is the way to go , had them for 30 years.
Heat output not as great as other models and takes longer to heat due to the ceramic liner but keeps giving heat after fire has died as heat is stored in the ceramic liner.
Big plus is they use bugger all wood that saves money if you buy firewood or time if you do you own , neighbour has a big output Masport and is envious of my low wood usage.
Happy days
Grant

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6 years 10 months ago #534263 by spark
Replied by spark on topic Pyroclassic... yay or nay??

barabrae wrote: Pyro is the way to go , had them for 30 years.
Heat output not as great as other models and takes longer to heat due to the ceramic liner ...[SNIP]


How has the ceramic liner faired over time?
Any issues with the the ceramic cracking, eroding or burning out?

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6 years 10 months ago #534273 by barabrae
The liners do crack over time and I have repaired with a special cement the manufactures sell , no dramas though as the metal circular enclosure on the outside of the ceramic liner holds it in place anyway so the liner may crack but not move.
One important thing with the Pyro is they love really dry wood so I would not buy one if not organised to ensure your wood is really dry, one neighbour pulled his out as reckoned it was useless with no heat output but he was cutting wood from the paddock and then trying to burn it , the 100mm flue also clogs quickly with wet wood.
I burn good dry wood and check my flue annually if cleaning required but I never need to as the flue is always clean inside , one thing I notice when looking at other houses around me is the smoke from neighbouring flues but none from mine when the fire has heated up and burning with way more efficiency than most fires.
We should all be using dry wood anyway to make all fires more efficient but a lot of Kiwi's aren't organised enough without being harsh..
As your paint on your Pryo ages a quick job to slide the panels off pull and send then off to the powder coater for a new coat or a colour change if you prefer.
Good luck with your choice.

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6 years 10 months ago #534276 by tonybaker
I would avoid anything with firebricks! They only put them in to protect the thin metal that the sides are made of. Go for a burner that has a thick metal top, 4mm min. The old Kent log fire was the best, but was prone to buckling the top plate and baffle assembly. Many engineers made a killing replacing the tops with thicker steel. You only get so much heat out of wood, a fair portion of it goes up the chimney! You need to allow for at least 3 cords of wood a year (11 cubic metres) and it has to be really dry, cut down at least a year ago and shed stored.
Unless you and your partner are really dedicated to wood chopping, go with the heat pump!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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6 years 10 months ago #534278 by Hawkspur
Whereas I would avoid anything without firebricks or ceramic liner. They make the steel last much longer, whatever the thickness.
The Pyroclassic does address some of the issues with plate steel construction of most modern woodburners, by surrounding the burning wood with a ceramic liner, and by being constructed without welds in a way that allows the heavy metal plates surrounding the ceramic to expand and contract. The top plate is 10mm thick.

I would be interested to hear from anyone with a pyroclassic and wetback especially if it isn't very close to the cylinder.

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6 years 10 months ago #534281 by Jaybee
Replied by Jaybee on topic Pyroclassic... yay or nay??
I have a pyroclassic and wetback. Everything barabrae has said is good advice, especially about needing dry wood.

I find the wetback good, our power bill goes down by about 10% in the winter compared with summer with the fire going, in spite of using an electric heater a few hours a day in another part of the house, doing more indoor cooking and using more lights.

The feature I really like is that it burns overnight. In the morning just pull the embers forward, open the air inlet and add some fuel and away you go. Because it uses the fuel efficiently you use less wood and create a lot less ash.

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6 years 10 months ago #534292 by spark
Replied by spark on topic Pyroclassic... yay or nay??

Hawkspur wrote: Whereas I would avoid anything without firebricks or ceramic liner. They make the steel last much longer, whatever the thickness. [SNIP]

I thought that the whole point of ceramics inside a fire was as thermal insulation to keep burning fuel hot so that it burns more completely. Heat is then extracted as IR radiation through the window in the door and the rest from the exhaust gases as they leave the ceramic lined firebox (hot plate on top of fire, hot flue pipe and wetback if it has one). We used to have a Contessa, which was constructed along these lines, and the instructions said to always leave a layer of ash on the bottom of the firebox to ensure that the steel bottom of the firebox is insulated from the fire above.

Generally speaking, unless it is so hot that it is glowing (which long term, is bad for steel), exposed steel is cold as far as combustion is concerned, and it sucks the heat out of the fire, which can result in incomplete combustion = more soot & smoke..

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6 years 10 months ago #534294 by Hawkspur
The ceramic performs two roles: it insulates and protects the steel from the very hot parts of the fire (reducing temperature fluctuations and oxidation losses), and holds the heat so the fire can burn more consistently. The losses from the steel are not huge when the fire isn't glowing, but the ceramic definitely increases the life of a steel woodburner both by retaining the steel and reducing buckling.

The ash bed can be an important layer in some woodburner designs.

The radiant heat doesn't only leave through the glazed portion. Some woodburners act as radiant heaters as much as convective heaters with significant amounts of heat radiating out from top and sides as well as through the front.

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