What to do with a pile of ash??????

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7 years 6 months ago #526286 by LindaVickie
Hi guys,
have had four old man pines felled and got heaps of fire wood :cheer:
Trouble is, after burning all the waste and more garden rubbish, I'm left with a HUGE pile of ash :(
What can I do with it now?? What do the rest of you guys do???
There was no household rubbish etc (so no plastics and all that kind of thing)
Look forward to your suggestions
Linda

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7 years 6 months ago #526289 by LongRidge
If there was no treated timber in what has been burnt, then the ashes can be used around plants that like alkaline conditions. I usee them in the vege garden, and also sprinkle ashes on the lawn and pasture. If there was treated timber in it, do not use on pasture or the vege garden, because of the chromium, copper and arsenic that is or was used for treating timber.

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7 years 6 months ago #526290 by Cigar
We used to put the ash from the open fireplace on the vegetables garden, it contains potassium but little to no nitrogen. I'd be a bit careful about applying large amounts though.. could be a good K fert to spread on a paddock maybe?

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7 years 6 months ago #526291 by LindaVickie
yep, rather large amount
maybe 6 trailer loads ????
all good fun :unsure:

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7 years 6 months ago #526301 by Stikkibeek
If all untreated, spread on your pasture. Should keep you out of mischief for a while.........................a loooong while :whistle: :evil:

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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7 years 6 months ago #526305 by kate
If it's as windy down there as it is up here it won't be there tomorrow to worry about... B) B)

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7 years 6 months ago #526306 by muri
Be careful to only use it sparsely on the garden if applying direct. Putting it on the paddocks is probably good but you could also compost it in layers for your garden for future use, Layer it with old hay and manure and you should have a lovely compost when it all breaks down

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7 years 6 months ago #526325 by LongRidge
After I have sprinkled a layer all over the parts of the garden that I want to be more alkaline, I sprinkle it onto the compost heap to make the heap a bit more alkaline so that the bugs can do more decomposing. Composting slows down then stops when the compost heap gets too acid.
But, as in BUT, ensure that all the butts are out so that the compost heap does not get set alight :( .

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7 years 6 months ago #526354 by kindajojo
Don't spread it on fresh, leave it for a bit to weather, can have a lot of sulphur in it...I spread ash round the paddocks....

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7 years 6 months ago #526361 by kate28
I've heard it can be used in chickens dusting areas and will help keep away their bugs. Havnt tried myself & not sure how true this is. Anyone else know?

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7 years 6 months ago #526432 by LindaVickie
Brilliant ! chicken dust bath. Googled that and there's heaps of info about it and curing lice etc. Can help with internal parasites if they eat charcoal. Seems chooks aren't dumb, they know when they need to eat it. Would never have thought of it
Boarded up a square metre or so area in the chooks yard and filled with ash - they love it !
Thanks for everyone's advice :)

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7 years 6 months ago #526433 by tonic
It is also good at riding trees of pear slug. I had a couple of tree infested with them last year and dusted them over with wood ash. By the next day there wasn't a slug in sight and they did not return.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Mudlerk

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7 years 5 months ago #526940 by sandgrubber
Replied by sandgrubber on topic What to do with a pile of ash??????
The ash is just minerals that were in the tree plus some charcoal. No harm done if you spread it around the ground where it came from.

In slash and burn cultivation, ash is regarded as fertilizer.

Ash tends to be alkaline, thus good if you have acidic soils. Don't put it around rhodedendrons, citrus, camelias, azelias, and other plants that like acidic soil. It can burn, especially when plants are young and tender. On the other hand, it will help control some bugs (in Western Australia, we made circles of ash around young plants to keep cutworms away).
Charcoal is super for any soil. HUGE cation exchange capacity, improves drainage, doesn't decompose for many years. If the 'ash' is quite black and lumpy, a thin layer, preferably mixed with mulch or applied over a fallow plot, will improve your soil.

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7 years 5 months ago #526979 by Deanna
Reminds me the neighbour has been burning his gum tree stumps and branches, I must go over and get some for the chickens. The love it.

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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7 years 5 months ago #526981 by muri
For those of you who dont know about Bio-Char, you might like to read this article
www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property...-benefits-your-garde
Its not strictly the focus of this topic but closely related and a great way of helping soil improvement

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