Best way to make money off a lifestyle block?

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10 years 9 months ago #471572 by cowvet

Woolpatch;474254 wrote:
A mechanic can fix a friends car at home despite the risk, a dive instructor can take a friend out diving and it is up to those involved to decide if they are pregnant or have asthma and if they are healthy enough. Why should a farmer be treated differently other than the fact that some in the industry have taken exception to it.


A mechanic can fix your car but they can't all give you a WOF. we have a WOF system to protect the public (regardless of whether you think you know your car is healthy and you are the safest driver on the planet)

Similarly your homekill butcher can process your meat for you but he/she can't certify it for public consumption.

Having done well over 500 dives and holding an advanced certification I am not aware of any instructor that would take any uncertified person out for a dive without fully briefing them on the safety issues and risks...not to mention the liability waiver they would probably get them to sign.

Contrary to popular belief the general public has no idea about meat with regard to food safety, zoonotic diseases and withholdings etc...they haven't had to because we have systems in place that deal with all that for them.


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 9 months ago #471578 by cowvet

Mrt007;462530 wrote:
So my questions for those who run their block with an intent to make money are
1. What livestock do you run or crops do you grow-

Sheep, cattle, dairy support, cereals, small seeds, process peas. Probably not profitable on a smaller scale.
Did grow flowers commercially but the time requirement was high (at a busy time of the year) and the water requirement was high - both were big limitations

2. Does it turn a profit-
Yes - but had a recent discussion on that and about converting to dairy. While it would increase our profit we would lose our life as we know it and hubby would lose his 'passion''. We will stay with what we know and enjoy.
3. How labour intensive is it-
Hmmm - we have staff...but when there is stock work to do in the weekends or lambs to get in for a truck in the morning or lambs arriving at 10pm at night for unloading we think of that as part of the lifestyle rather than as labour.

4. Are there any helpful places/websites to get info from-
5. How much capital outlay would you need to make initially-
a humungous mortgage
6. How much prior animal husbandry would one require-
I am a strong believer that if people intend to get animals then they should learn as much as they can before they jump in. If they don't know then they should be prepared to get outside help quickly.

I may be a bit jaded but I get a bit tired of going to smaller operations and having totally inappropriate or absent facilities for the job that needs doing.

Plan plan plan and then act. When you make it up as you go along it gets expensive, you make poor decisions and if animals are involved then it can sometimes be at their expense.

7. What is the most effective method you have found to make it profitable-
research and planning. investigate your costs and your market as well as the time you will need to put into it.

8. Are there hidden costs the novice needs to consider in their budget-
nothings hidden - just unexpected... and you should find most of these if you do your homework first.

9. What have you tried which turned out to be a failure-

10. Further comments/advice-
find something you are genuinely interested and passionate about. If you are going to be doing this in your spare time in your home environment then you need to enjoy it and your people living with you need to do the same.

Interesting Country Calendar program last night on the lady around Rotorua that started a native plant nursery. Started with a passion, grew heaps and is now a very successful business.

Any requirement for water in Canterbury needs to be very carefully researched.

.

Forgot something - setting up a business at home is a real tie. We employ staff so can get away on decent holidays. if your business is not employing people then you may not be able to get away. If it involves animals then they need someone to keep an eye on them when you aren't there. Don't get a business that is busy at a time of year when something else in your life (family, jobs, things you like to do) should be taking priority. fast track to resentment!


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 9 months ago #471586 by LongRidge
So very, very true .... like carting in hay on Christmas Day, carting in hay at midnight on the eve of the millenium, only getting away together for overnight five times in the last 22 years (but she is awful to travel with, so alone or with friends is far preferable).

Woolpatch, I suspect that you have missed a bit of history re the meat regulations and homekill. We still do not export ovine meat to Scandinavia because of the Salmonella outbreak that NZ mutton caused in 1952.
The homekill rules have been tightened to stop some friendly locals in Auckland selling pork to their friends .... that they had got from pigs that had died, not slaughtered. Then there is the uninspected horsemeat trade that is labelled dogfood but sold knowingly for humans to cook and eat. I think that has not been sorted out yet, so do not be surprised if the laws are tightened further.

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10 years 9 months ago #471587 by Ruth

LongRidge;474276 wrote: ...but she is awful to travel with, so alone or with friends is far preferable...

If my partner wrote of me as you write of yours, he'd have to find somewhere else to live. Why do you live with someone you don't really like?

Cowvet, the other side of "Don't get a business that is busy at a time of year when something else in your life (family, jobs, things you like to do) should be taking priority." is don't get a job at a time of year your business should take priority! I took a job which takes me away from here during native orchid flowering season. I'm going to give up the job. :D Wandering around gazing at pretty things is my business.

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10 years 9 months ago #471601 by kindajojo
You don't know what you don't know?

As far as selling homekill goes....... are you personally prepared to accept responsibility for anything that goes wrong? I am not.

I also would not eat chicken from an unreliable source, I rarely eat hangi meat, as I have seen many where the meat does not appear properly cooked, I also will not buy puha/cress from markets as I have seen it collected from the drains along the side of the road.

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10 years 9 months ago #471604 by cowvet

Ruth;474277 wrote: If my partner wrote of me as you write of yours, he'd have to find somewhere else to live. Why do you live with someone you don't really like?

Cowvet, the other side of "Don't get a business that is busy at a time of year when something else in your life (family, jobs, things you like to do) should be taking priority." is don't get a job at a time of year your business should take priority! I took a job which takes me away from here during native orchid flowering season. I'm going to give up the job. :D Wandering around gazing at pretty things is my business.

mmmmm probably a bit of that depends on which is your primary income and whether you really need that or not in order to cover you while your home business gets off the ground
My farming business takes priority over my off farm job. My family takes priority over everything but generally our family lifestyle fits in around the farming lifestyle ( ie, the kids understand that we can do winter sports etc but summer revolves more around the farming business and I don't want to be trotting them off to sport on Saturday while we are harvesting etc)


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 9 months ago #471605 by Ruth
Hungi? Hangi, perhaps? We've seen people stop here and collect watercress from the drains. Not only are there issues of dust and vehicle polutants, but the water comes down from a paddock full of cattle - a fluke risk, surely?

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10 years 9 months ago #471609 by max2
Just touching on the lifestyle family thing, all three of us enjoy what we do (except the mud [}:)]) however visiting family need a kick up the proverbials.

We are available to host a lunch or even dinner, but when its done its time to bugger off home again as its not an all day affair and our place isn't a resort where you can drink my wine (cos they don't bring any of their own) whilst declaring what a lovely place this is, and then in the next breathe tell me I'm working too hard.... grrr.

Be prepared to say some tough words, I will be shortly to people who i suspect really should know better by now.

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10 years 9 months ago #471618 by max2

LongRidge;474276 wrote: Then there is the uninspected horsemeat trade that is labelled dogfood but sold knowingly for humans to cook and eat. I think that has not been sorted out yet, so do not be surprised if the laws are tightened further.


The regulators have had plenty of opportunity to do something about that. I worked "just" down the road from where t* R*da* did his programme from, and that place was still open and operating after airing on national TV.
Eventually they also had another nearby location although still took horses at the small industrial site where they were filmed. We (at my former employer) still received people knocking on the window looking for the butchers around the corner. I would always direct them back to main road butchery, but they usually found their way back again....

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10 years 9 months ago #471619 by Woolpatch

cowvet;474260 wrote: A mechanic can fix your car but they can't all give you a WOF. we have a WOF system to protect the public (regardless of whether you think you know your car is healthy and you are the safest driver on the planet)

Similarly your homekill butcher can process your meat for you but he/she can't certify it for public consumption.

Having done well over 500 dives and holding an advanced certification I am not aware of any instructor that would take any uncertified person out for a dive without fully briefing them on the safety issues and risks...not to mention the liability waiver they would probably get them to sign.

Contrary to popular belief the general public has no idea about meat with regard to food safety, zoonotic diseases and withholdings etc...they're haven't had to because we have systems in place that deal with all that for them.

Fair points cowvet, of course I'm not advocating that the meat be sold or even certified.

I just want the right to accept meat from people I trust. If they wanted me to sign a liability waiver first I would be more than happy to do so.

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10 years 9 months ago #471624 by Ruth
I've felt some trepidation about eating other people's homekill meat, especially when they've demonstrated a cavalier attitude to withholding periods at any point during our acquaintance. I personally prefer to leave a homekill animal undrenched for a year or so before slaughter. If they're not healthy enough to sustain themselves without medicinal support, they're not healthy and happy enough for me to want to eat them!

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10 years 9 months ago #471628 by Woolpatch
I agree but then I also know folks that I have great respect for and I know plenty of organic farmers.

On that note how do we know that withholding periods have been respected even if we purchase certified meat. Isn't it all down to trusting the integrity of the farmer anyway. At least when we receive homekill from friends we know something of the farmers character.

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10 years 9 months ago #471632 by cowvet

Woolpatch;474321 wrote: I agree but then I also know folks that I have great respect for and I know plenty of organic farmers.

On that note how do we know that withholding periods have been respected even if we purchase certified meat. Isn't it all down to trusting the integrity of the farmer anyway. At least when we receive homekill from friends we know something of the farmers character.


commercial farms that send meat through the regulated meat trade are regularly audited and must maintain records and prove that stock meet their withholding times. All animals sent into the works are send with an ASD form. The farmer signs a claim that all animals are within withholding times and have not been fed ruminant protein etc.

For me if a farmer gave me free meat I would be wondering what was wrong with it - why give it away when you could be getting top dollar for the top grade stuff at the works!


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 9 months ago #471641 by Woolpatch
You still have to trust that a treatment wasn't recently administered to a particular animal that's being sent off to the works with a larger mob. No amount of paper work, form signing or audits is going to prevent a farmer without a conscience from getting away with that if they want to. Add to that the trust you have to put into every operator, supermarket personal and restaurant worker who comes into contact with it and I would certainly feel safer eating meat from a trusted friend who has killed and prepared it.

The norm in my community is that people like to share what they have. Every favour or gift gets returned back in some form or another. Homekill meat is worth more to the recipient than what the farmer would get at the works.

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10 years 4 months ago #483350 by Brin
Mrt007, It is something I am passionate about, and for a similar reason, our children . I think your dog training idea is a good one and could be very fruitful . A lot of people have talked about passion, that is what the motivation needs to be.
I take my family on the lsb from time to time, it is sometimes too hard to have the children helping but they can be there watching . My boys aged 5 and 8 help me often, it is good, they help with the animals, planting and harvesting crops, off course it not only teaches them good work ethic, but team work and animal husbandry, plant care, and a healthy respect for machinery . We have a 22ha block in northland, we rear calves, make supplements (contractor) for sale and to feed our stock . We sell or lease mature dairy stock and sell or eat other stock . We have spent a lot of capital on machinery and have often borrowed/leased machinery for market garden production . We apply fertiliser regularly . In the end we pay our rates, electricity and lsb running expenses . (all of this is said in a positive way)
I work off farm for our living .
If you are going to buy a property and work (off lsb) at the same time I think it is good to have the house where you can see all of the property, so you can keep an eye on what is happening .

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