Power used in shorting electric fencing

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10 years 10 months ago #34806 by anniendanny
Hi,

We have been using portable electric fencing to try and contain pigs. Being in sandy coastal soil the older pig is digging up huge strips of turf and dumping them on the fencing.

My understanding is that once an electric fence is shorted, it uses large amounts of electricity, but my neighbour - who was born and raised a farmer and has put up electric fencing - assures me that being shorted makes no difference to the cost, and it will only use a few cents a day.

We have got our power bill, and it is quite high, but on the other hand I have also been doing quite a bit of summer preserving, which may raise the cost.

What is your experience of power usage and shorting electric fences..

Annie

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10 years 10 months ago #457883 by Ruth
They don't use a lot of electricity, even when shorting. The power of the shock is in the voltage, not the current which runs though the fence, the animal, or the dumped turf.

Blame those pesky preserves! Do you mean you make things yourself? What sort of oddity are you? [}:)] :D

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10 years 10 months ago #457891 by Akzle
Replied by Akzle on topic Power used in shorting electric fencing
go solar power and then you'll find much more interest in tracking it.

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10 years 10 months ago #457895 by spark
Hi,

Almost all electric fences use electricity at the same rate regardless of the load that is connected to them. Basically, about once a second, they charge a capacitor with electricity, and then completely discharge this capacitor into a transformer that boosts the voltage up to several thousand volts, which is brough out to the terminals for fence connection - if the electricity is not consumed by a load (animal, short circuit, etc) across the fence, it gets turned into heat inside the fence charger.

If you have high power bills, and are not using lots of electric heating or cooling (fan heaters, oil collum heaters, heat pump, walk in freezer, etc) then the first thing I would check would be your (electric?) hot water cylinder.
Do your hot taps drip?
Do you get water or steam coming out the vent pipe (on the roof for an old system, down the drain for a new system) for your hot water cylinder?
Is your hot water cylinder thermostat working properly (your cylinder should not be boiling the water, nor heating it to 80 or 90 something degrees...).
Are any of the hot water pipes leaking under the house?

Other possible issues are malfunctioning water pumping systems (eg bad pressure switches, corroded impellers or bad cold water leaks - broken stock trough ballcock?) - resulting in a pump that runs continuously or at least more often than it should. If you have a fancy septic tank with electric pump(s) in it, that might be playing up too.

Cheers

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10 years 10 months ago #457906 by LongRidge
As stated, I think your neighbour is correct. It is the current that produces the shock. If it were voltage that shocked then you would get killed by the 8000 volts out of your fence, and not harmed by the 240 volts out of your power socket in the house.
Your unit pumps out the amount of current that it is designed to do, whether it is going to earth, to animal, or returning. But if you have a good short the power is going to earth, and it is easier for the power to go to earth than through the animal, so the fence does not work. The power use is the same but the fence does not work.

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10 years 10 months ago #457910 by Aquila
Voltage is how far down the wire the electricity gets. Current is how big of a shock you get

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2

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10 years 10 months ago #457913 by anniendanny
We have actually installed a fire place and wetback in December, and have turned off the hot water cylinder, so our off-peak metre has not moved at all.

If the metre reader has it right (we looked at his little machine to see last month's reading), we have used 600 KW in a month - that is $200+ about what we used in winter with the hot water and heater (we heated one room at a time, and slept in the baby's room).

We had done more watering, with on-demand pumps, but I would not think it would make that big a difference.

Annie

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