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Topic-icon Pigs and Barley

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9 years 3 months ago #314707 by FraSla

I soak it for 24 hours then drain it and let it sprout and start growing it a bit before I feed it to them. I use an old can-o-worms worm farm for it. Soak it in the bottom layer, let the bung out to drain it then put it on one of the trays. Its a bit of shifting about but you can have one lot soaking and 3 lots sprouting with ease.


[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]I'm open minded and I'm looking to learn something everyday. [:D]

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9 years 3 months ago #314722 by Andrea1

Or you could simply cook it. Over the winter if we have to feed pigs (which we do sometimes when mumma pig decides to have a late litter), we just put a pot on the wood stove overnight and it's done in the morning. Also works well in a slow cooker.

Cheers
Andrea
Oxford

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9 years 3 months ago #314723 by cantyguy

I've fattenned heaps of pigs on barley over the years. I used to cook it in an old copper along with rabbit or possum carcasses or crush it with lucern to prevent them getting too fat.
I would think just soaking it should be fine. Maybe you need to let it soak longer to ensure it breaks down when digested.

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9 years 3 months ago #314741 by LongRidge

Cooking it with heat for 10 minutes or so will make any food, even fruit, more digestible, but if the barley hasn't had the bran/husk removed then that is unlikely to be digested very well even with cooking.

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9 years 2 months ago #314891 by bayrose1

I used to cook ours for about 3 hours. that is fill a big pot with 1/4 barley fill to almost top with water and cook it slowly. Noticed pigs still had barley poo's

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9 years 2 months ago #314905 by foufee

We're in the progress of trying the sprouting idea, how long did it used to take FraSla?

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9 years 2 months ago #315327 by jdnz

We don't buy whole barley for our pigs anymore. It was a bit of a pain having to soak the barley each night and morning (we would soak for 24 hours) so now buy barley meal. We just add water to it immediately before feeding so that it is a porridge consistency. We add their pig nuts/pellets to this and they love it. Barley meal is a bit harder to get hold of but we've managed to source some locally for a really good price - I think $23 per 40kg bag. We just give the guy a call when we're down to our last couple of bags and he orders us another 10 and even deliver for free. Every other seed/grain supplier we went to needed an order of 1 tonne or more.

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1 week 4 days ago #546093 by gabby.brewer

hi. where do you get your barley meal from... are you based in Canterbury? getting ready to get a wee kunekune piglet and doing as much research as i can before he arrives in early May.

any other kunekune advise would be very welcomed.... esp around house training them
thanks
gabby

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1 week 4 days ago #546096 by Kilmoon

Farmlands sells 25kg bags of crushed barley.

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1 week 4 days ago #546103 by LongRidge

Farmlands also sell pellets that are designed for pigs, which will be more expensive per kilogram than crushed barley but there will be much less work and waste involved.

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1 week 3 days ago #546108 by Ronney

Hi gabby and welcome to the site :)

If your piglet is a true Kune it isn't going to need barley. In fact, it is going to need very little of anything at all.

Your comment on "house training" concerns me but if he is living outside (which he should be), pasture, supplemented with vegetable waste from the garden/house and some Multifeed nuts or a specific pig feed, should be more than enough for him.

If it is a "him" and you don't intend to add to your piggery or use him for breeding, I would recommend you seriously look at having him barrowed (castrated).

Cheers,
Ronnie

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1 week 3 days ago #546115 by LongRidge

When he or she is a 200 kg monster, you will not want it lumbering around the house, knocking things off tables and shelves, and sitting on furniture not designed for that weight and shape. And I assure you, you are not going to want to re-train it to live in a new abode outside. Teach it that it's outside home is it's only home right from the beginning :-).
Never make a pet of any male animal (except perhaps a budgie or a goldfish). Animals are not little humans, even t6hough humans are sometimes animals :-(. You cannot train out their innate characteristics, and males with that hormone called testosterone are much more liable to return to their innate characteristics, and unpredictably :-(.

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1 week 2 days ago #546132 by kate28

Pigs are easy to house train but I do agree you won't want him in the house as he gets big. We breed pigs and at xmas had one that wasn't doing well with the sow so bought her inside, fed on milk. She was quite cool, would hold her own & climb up on the dogs bed beside them. After feeding we would take her out same as a puppy & she would do poos & wees before coming back in. She knew the routine & was very clean. She would snuggle up on any blanket she could find in house, go in kids bedroom. She slept in a crate at night. She was quick & would get under our feet & get inside even when not wanted. She became a bit of a pain when she naturally wanted a mud wallow over summer & then would come back in & lay down inside, brush against the furniture etc. She was a great pet, very loving & enjoyed a nice belly rub, great with the little kid. She got moved outside with the mud business at about February & now lives with the other pigs. She still has a great personality & adores Pat's. She will be a breeding sow later on.

My advice would be get a female or else have the boar castrated & detusked. Either start with pig outside or move outside while small. Also I advise two pigs, we never sell singles. Pigs get lonely & dont have very good body temp regulation so snuggle up with a buddy,esp in winter. They can be more troublesome by themselves.
We had a hand raised kune boar as a pet when I was young & he turned into trouble couldn't get near him & he wanted to attack the other livestock. My father always said he should be castrated but mother couldn't imagine her wee darling turning nasty.... bad decision.

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1 week 1 day ago #546147 by LongRidge

I haven't told the story of our "Miss Piggy" for a few years now. She came to us at 350 grams found beside the road on Takaka Hill. I was going to train her as a replacement sheep dog, and for a while all went well. But then we found a lamb with it's back legs eaten off, but it might not have been Miss Piggy ..... So she stayed a while longer. But some pigs, like some humans, get grumpy at that time of the month and she tried to kill the dog. Also, the ploughing was not what and where we wanted it, so she had to go. I cut 40 kg of fat away from the 23 kg of meat :-(.

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1 week 1 day ago #546148 by kate28

Longridge, a couple years ago i posted a very similar story on here about our "miss piggy" she was great for a long time then all of a sudden all hell broke loose & she chased me running flat tack foaming at the mouth through 3 paddocks. I closed 3 gates & she threw all 3 off their hinges then patrolled round & round the locked house looking for me who was shut inside frightened. My young baby was stranded at my mother's house up the lane with me unable to go and collect her. I drove out to close the front gate on the mule & pig charged the mule, I threw a bucket of food which had no effect & she kept coming. I phoned neighbors to ome shoot this savage (& enormous) pig but they weren't home. Couple days later she was fine. Butcher couldn't take her & next heat same thing! Butcher said he hadn't seen so much fat on a pig before..she made the best sausages though.

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