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Topic-icon Apple ID

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1 month 4 weeks ago #545315 by tonybaker

I grew apple trees from seed, leftovers from cider making, and they grew into nice "whips" ideal for grafting. I prefer to graft as that way you are sure to get an apple that you like, not what nature decides!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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1 month 4 weeks ago #545318 by Blueberry

I'm all for grafting - it's fun! some years ago, i bought a bundle of 100 dwarfing rootstocks from Waimea Nurseries, but there are nurseries that sell smaller quantities, like Koanga, or Thunder Mountain.
The advantage of the dwarfing rootstock is that you get fruit sooner. This year, i am having a bumper apple crop! 60-odd different varieties! - just because.... :-))


[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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1 month 4 weeks ago #545319 by tonybaker

there is some debate about dwarfing rootstock. Today's thinking is that it is better to use vigorous stock and control by pruning. Most people don't prune early enough, you have to be quite brutal after you have planted them.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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1 month 3 weeks ago #545345 by Blueberry

That entirely depends on what use you put the tree to and the environment you'll be using it.
I chose dwarf because they fruit years earlier than a vigorous stock. I wanted to be able to identity the taste and growth of each individual apple in my environment, before i decided which ones to propagate on 'normal' rootstocks.
I also recommend dwarf rootstocks to novel gardeners who have a small-ish section they want to plant 'self-sustainably', but are in a hurry to harvest.
Don't for a minute imagine that a gardener new to growing has the slightest idea what kind of pruning is required to keep an M793 rootstock small. And don't get me started on tip bearers....


[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth
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