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Topic-icon Ballarat apples!

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1 year 6 days ago #539036 by Ruth

We are slightly inattentive orchardists, rarely paying sufficient attention to our young trees at the right time but we seem to have nurtured the Ballarats sufficiently for a very satisfactory fruiting this year. I've just eaten some stewed apple with fresh cream, just like I did all through my childhood. Delicious!

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1 year 6 days ago #539038 by Stikkibeek

Our apples stepped up 10 notches this year too.Red Gravenstein were first to ripen and every bit as delicious as i remember they were. Have just about finished stewing/eating raw Royal Gala, and Golden Delicious, and now starting on the Fuji which I'm really enjoying. There are sturmer ripening, but they are a cooking apple that demands too much sugar, so I don't care if the chooks get them. last to ripen will be granny smith. Monty's surprise wasn't at all a surprise this year. it set 3 apples in a bunch, two fell off long before ripening and the third just disappeared. Can't say i'm surprised. The tree i have is rubbish.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last Edit: 1 year 6 days ago by Stikkibeek.

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1 year 5 days ago #539040 by Wren

Oh stop gloating you guys - a couple of days ago our goats ripped through our 'tree protection' efforts and now our young apple tree is severely lacking in leaves and bark (...and the plum, and the quince).

I think the quince will survive if I prune it down low, but the other two, I fear, are gonners, so it's going to be a while until we are eating any homegrown apples now!! :(


Muddling our way through 1Ha on the Christchurch Port Hills, with flocks of heritage chickens, Silver Appleyard ducks, Gotland sheep, and Arapawa goats.

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1 year 5 days ago #539041 by Ruth

Oh crap!

We planted in an area then unused for stock ... and then discovered that the neighbours didn't care if their animals scrambed through the boundary fence. Fortunately they were only a couple of sheep but it led us to install back-up electric fencing, so that if any unexpected stock managed to get anywhere near, they'd still have another barrier to keep them out. I'm glad we did that.

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1 year 5 days ago #539043 by Stikkibeek

Wren wrote: Oh stop gloating you guys - a couple of days ago our goats ripped through our 'tree protection' efforts and now our young apple tree is severely lacking in leaves and bark (...and the plum, and the quince).

I think the quince will survive if I prune it down low, but the other two, I fear, are gonners, so it's going to be a while until we are eating any homegrown apples now!! :(


Somehow the vision of a goat "talking with a plum in its mouth" or a goat head with an apple in its mouth while its head reclines on a large meat platter, doesn't have the same appeal as either the "well connected' or a roasted pig! :P


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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1 year 5 days ago #539054 by Anakei

I planted a few trees last year. Kingston Black, for cider, but only had 1 apple. Not a lot of cider this year :lol: A Bramley which set a lot of fruit (which I was pleased about because it is a triploid) but then the fruit dropped off during the hot weather we had in November. There is also a Mother which had 1 apple which disappeared. The star was an Egremont Russet which was weighed down with fruit - lovely flavour but quite a thick skin it makes a fluffy apple sauce, so I've bottled some and I'm just eating the last few, mainly with a good strong cheddar!


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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1 year 4 days ago #539067 by Mudlerk

My Egremont russet seems to withstand insect and fungal attacks better than my other apples...wonder if the russeting sort of 'armours' it?

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