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Topic-icon Growing peaches in Waikato

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10 years 8 months ago #214983 by xevbellringer

We have. We had 3 Golden Queens at Taupiri which grew fine, smallish fruit but lovely & sweet. Peaches also grew nicely out Raglan way when we were in Waitetuna Valley. Just remember to copper (or sulphur?) spray in winter. As far as I am aware - that's OK in organics?

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10 years 8 months ago #214989 by LongRidge

Peaches, and even moreso apricots, need some winter chill. If you plant them in a spot that gets some winter frost then you might be lucky. Also, some varieties need more chill than others, so again, if you have got the right varieties then you might be lucky.
We used to get HEAPS of peaches in Thames. Every stone that I threw out the window grew, got transplanted to the farm, and produced lots of white-fleshed fruit no trouble.

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10 years 8 months ago #215009 by Gracelands

We always had plenty of peaches at Pokeno when I was a kid (Well the possums did, anyway. ) I have had a great crop of golden queens here one year out of four, and I'm in North East Waikato (just)

Also Peachgrove Road in Hamilton was so named because of a large grove of peaches there planted by Maori before Hamilton was uh 'acquisitioned' in the wars.


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10 years 8 months ago #215012 by devan

My mother in law grew the most yummy peaches in Morrinsville, no problems at all. In fact i took some cuttings and planted them at my place and they do very well (onewhero)


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10 years 8 months ago #215021 by Birman Babe

We have a peach tree here in Paeroa but the birds normally get to them before we do :-(

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10 years 8 months ago #215055 by reggit

We have successfully grown peaches, but brown rot does tend to get a lot of them - humidity is not good around here! We never sprayed ours though. I would say give it a go! As Gracelands says, Peachgrove Road down from us was a very successful area for growing this fruit.


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10 years 8 months ago #215068 by Gracelands

One of the things I'm trying to do today if the weather allows is copper spray my peach and plum trees for the first time ever. I'm hoping that will make a difference to my crops this summer


"Just living is not enough. One must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower."
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10 years 8 months ago #215215 by bethy

HI all, I have grown nectarines and peaches organically (without any spray inputs whatsoever) for many years. They need to be in a drafty spot to keep the air circulating around them. I do not bother with store-bought or grafted varieties as they tend to 'need' some chemical input or lots of tlc. I prefer to plant stones from nectarines or peaches that I have liked and have shown to be disease resistant for their owner. These stones will themselves fruit in 3 years. A quick turnaround! And then you have a disease free, high health, hardy specimen that needs nothing other than some compost, seaweed, fish or garden tea for its mineral requirements - and voila you get lots of yummy spray free fruit. Leaf curl can be an issue with store bought ones too, but the home-grown ones tend to be free of it. If you are battling leaf curl and want to control it organically, after leaf fall you completely cover the ground under the drip-line of the tree with carpet, waste haylage etc so that there is a deep mulch to stop the leaf curl spores rising. Brown Rot is another disease that will attack susceptible trees and if there is humidity around the time of ripening you will need to check your fruit twice a day and harvest any with a small blemish (brown rot) - you can then salvage the majority of your fruit. But sometimes if it is a bad year and your fruit tree is not that happy or healthy you may as well wait for another year. Collect all the fallen fruit though and discard to where there are no peaches or nectarines. Peaches and nectarines are fairly short lived in comparison to apple trees etc but a summer prune (on a dry day after fruiting) will be beneficial to keep the vigour of the tree.

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10 years 8 months ago #215217 by dinnaefash

Thanks, everyone! Oh, it's so exciting :D :p I guess we won't get much fruit this first year, anyway, then we'll see what happens!


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10 years 8 months ago #215322 by NZ Appaloosas

I dunno--they grow peaches in Georgia, and that's hot and humid, with a bit of winter chill (no snow, but the leaves do change colour on the trees). Not a peach fan, so no advice to offer.

Diane



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10 years 8 months ago #215337 by jen

So do all of you guys get frosts? Or does the chill requirement not need to be that cold? I'm moving onto a hill where they can get snow but they reputedly don't get frosts.... just trying to figure out what fruit I can grow in dwarf forms. I know there are heaps to choose from.


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10 years 8 months ago #215341 by NZ Appaloosas

I would say Georgia doesn't get much frost. Unfortunately, I can't think of anyone who lives in GA, grows peaches, that I can ask...

Diane



Featuring Wap Spotted, sire of the first Wap Spot 2 grandget in Southern Hemisphere and New Zealand

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10 years 8 months ago #215343 by betenoir

Well I grew them Ok in Northland and frosts were pretty non-existent there. Maybe it was the types of Peaches and Nectarines..they were all heirloom varieties. One of the white fleshed nectarines was used by Koanga Gardens. It was about 30 years old and produced loads of fruit.


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10 years 8 months ago #215349 by AdoubleJ

We have the most beautiful juicy peaches, necatrines and apricots - unless we get a bloody drought of course!! We have maybe about 4 - 5 frosts through the winter - don't know if that actually makes any difference.


AdoubleJ

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3 years 10 months ago #507835 by Sarahdodds200@gmail.com

Does Anyone in Waikato (Hamilton/ngaruawahia area) that grow peaches have any left over seeds they don't want. I'd love to try growing from seed.

Thanks,


Twin three year old boys, 1 year old baby boy. 2 dogs, 2 miniature horses, 5 ducks 2 chickens and too many bees to count.

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