Growing trees for firewood

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3 years 8 months ago #552202 by Treegrower
Hi all first time posting on here and don't own a lifestyle block but live on a quarter acre property with a disused,vacant section next to it that used to belong to some neighbors years ago until they sold it to Transit(now NZTA) and now belongs to The Crown.

Anyway I've been thinking of planting some firewood trees on the section because it's never mowed unless I do it and I tried growing some vegetables on it but it failed utterly so would it be worth putting some poplar/fast growing gum trees in for firewood that might thrive where delicate vegetable plants failed?

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3 years 8 months ago #552205 by Hazza
Replied by Hazza on topic Growing trees for firewood
Go for it.

Just watch out for power lines etc and be prepared to lose it all if it gets sold or they take offense and clear it.

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3 years 8 months ago #552219 by Treegrower
Okay I would appreciate some advice and tips on growing trees. The soil is pretty free draining and seems to support grass and trees even native kanukas.

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3 years 8 months ago #552220 by Stikkibeek
Natives tend to grow more slowly than other trees, and poplar is no good for firewood as it's a soft wood.Also, many councils won't let you cut down natives once they reach a certain height.
Is buying the section an option so as to avoid disappointment in the future?

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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3 years 8 months ago #552222 by LongRidge
Poplars will grow too tall, and will drop leaves on your roof and property. With our Contessa, I like poplar as firewood for burning during the day, because it is really easy to split, does not make too much heat, and leaves very few ashes.
With gum trees, on a very hot day the oil in the leaves vaporises so they can be a big fire risk in dry summers.
For native bird food, I would go for a mix of tree lucerne and kowhai.

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3 years 8 months ago #552228 by tonybaker
Tree Lucerne (Tagasaste) as it is quick growing, fixes nitrogen, bees love it and stock eat it - and of course it makes great firewood. Another one is Paulownia, very fast growing and pretty flowers, also stock eat it. otherwise, work the ground up and plant spuds or wheat for making your own bread!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
The following user(s) said Thank You: Treegrower

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3 years 8 months ago #552285 by Treegrower
Are Sugar Gums or She-oak good firewood trees and where can I buy seedlings/saplings in Auckland as Googling it didn't give many relevant results?

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3 years 8 months ago #552286 by Stikkibeek
You can buy Sheoaks (better known as casuarina ) at any reputable tree company. While i have read plenty about them being good firewood, I personally found them very disappointing and wouldn't bother with them for burning. They do make pretty good shelt though although can grow very high, but have the benefit of making good shelter if you pollard them or as an alternative, Coppice then.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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3 months 3 days ago - 3 months 1 day ago #559362 by AlexBarkat
Planting firewood trees like poplar or fast-growing gum trees could be a fantastic idea. They tend to thrive in areas where delicate plants struggle, providing a reliable source of firewood while requiring less maintenance.Poplars and gums are hardy and can adapt to various conditions, making them a great choice for that vacant section. They grow quickly, so you'll have a good supply of firewood in the future without much hassle.By the way, if you're exploring different options, you might also want to consider the camphor tree . It's another hardy species that's known for its usefulness and resilience. Do some research on it as it could be a valuable addition to your consideration list!
Last edit: 3 months 1 day ago by AlexBarkat.

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3 months 3 days ago #559363 by tonybaker
Poplar is NOT popular for firewood and gum is not necessarily fast growing unless you really look after it. Wattle is probably the best all round tree but Tagasaste beats them all for hot burning and ease of establishment. Been there done all that!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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3 months 2 days ago #559365 by Hertz Donut
We're planting a row of Tagasaste as an all-round source of goodness - stock fodder, bird/bee attractant, firewood, and as a bonus, a hedgerow to block out an annoying neighbour.

Don't ask me, it was on its side when I got here.

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3 months 2 days ago #559366 by tonybaker
my Tagasaste is 35 years old and still growing strong. Heaps of flowers and the occasional dead branch that makes very good firewood. The only drawback if used for hedging is that it loves being trimmed, and will grow even more! I ripped the planting line first to give good root establishment.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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3 months 2 days ago #559367 by Hertz Donut
I'm planning to rip a line too, the soil quite is heavily compacted in that paddock so there's a fair amount of prep work to be done. It'll be about 10m in from the boundary fence so vehicles and stock can get to the back of it.

Don't ask me, it was on its side when I got here.

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3 months 1 day ago #559368 by tonybaker
well done Hertz, nice to see someone doing things correctly, a few treeguards will be useful, those rabbits just love the Tag. If you can source used grapevine guards that helps. My Tags have been an invaluable resource for the sheep when it's really dry. I even help a couple of neighbours cut their hedges so I can get the branches. I have got a set of forks that go on the back of the Fergie, that makes picking up the slash very quick and easy. It always amazes me to see very old dead looking branches suddenly start producing lovely green growth. That reminds me, I need to saw up some old dead limbs to start filling the woodshed!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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2 months 4 weeks ago #559375 by kate
Replied by kate on topic Growing trees for firewood
We planted lots of Tagasaste when we first came here - the goats love it. But they've all just died. Not sure whether the very wet year we had was the cause or if 11-12 years is their natural lifespan up here but wherever on the farm they were, they're dead or dying. The willows and poplars are still going strong...

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