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Topic-icon Claret Ash Trees

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1 week 2 hours ago #546173 by Hufalena

Hi - I am new so hope this is the correct place for this question.

We want to plant some large shade trees in our horse paddocks and love the look of the claret ash - they come up on searches for Coastal Shade Trees.

Anyone else have these on coastal properties? we are taranaki and can see the ocean - its about 1.5km away.

If they aren't suitable - I thought the London Plane tree - but that doesn't get the pretty red in Autumn

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6 days 9 hours ago #546175 by Mudlerk

Our claret ash...in equally windy Manawatu...split in winter gales every year, until it was all gone. The prettiest autumn tree I know is the liquidamber, with a whole bunch of maples fighting for my second choice. Unfortunately, none of these are very wind-resistant, either -- though our liquidamber has survived, only 10 metres away from the claret ash.

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6 days 9 hours ago #546176 by Hufalena

Oh bugger! I have ordered 10 Claret Ash's for planting in June - might have to relook at that. Maples aren't usually safe for horses to eat. We have gumball Liquid ambers on our house section and had to put up wind cloth until our Griselina's grow up for some win protection.

Is there any other suggested beautiful shade tree for coastal planting safe for horses and a bit pretty?

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5 days 9 hours ago #546188 by Mudlerk

Of course, it could've just been a weakness peculiar to this particular tree...one swallow doesn't make a summer. The only other ash trees I've been around were the ones in my front yard as a kid [in an Ohio house we left when I was ten], and I don't remember any of them splitting.

Last Edit: 5 days 8 hours ago by Mudlerk. Reason: spelling

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5 days 6 hours ago #546191 by Kokamo

I'm keen to plant Claret Ash as shade trees too, there are truckloads around Martinborough so I'm hoping that means they're suitable for our location, despite some occasional strong winds. Have you thought of asking the experts at SouthernWoods or Leafland, see what they say about exposed conditions.

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5 days 5 hours ago #546192 by Furball

If the claret ash idea doesn't pan out, Weeping willows are fairly wind-resistant, fast-growing, non-toxic and will make very pretty shade trees over time, especially when they have neatly trimmed bottoms at stock neck length.

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5 days 5 hours ago #546193 by Kokamo

Do weeping willows need to be by streams, I like the idea of them for stock food, but we have no natural water. And I want to be able to limit their height.

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4 days 20 hours ago #546195 by Stikkibeek

We didn't have any luck with weeping willows. They all died after about a year in the ground, despite our care. The local tree people told us to plant an ash and it's doing very well (despite the goats breaking in and stripping it) and is now about 4 years old


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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4 days 1 hour ago #546197 by Hawkspur

Someone involved in Christchurch Council plantings told me that they have issues with the willows by the river there because a NZ native fungus attacks them and can kill them off, so they are not a great choice for longevity.

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3 days 11 hours ago #546200 by muri

Alders are very fast growing and make great shade trees and not toxic to stock.
I prefer the mexican alder, it tends to be almost evergreen but does lose leaves in winter winds, but they are attractive trees and you need something fast growing and the alders arethat

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