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Topic-icon Dead Sheep

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2 months 3 weeks ago #544201 by terralsb

Hello,

we have now the first time that a sheep died. We try to find a way to dispose of it. We were told to dig a hole but the ground is not the way that this is easy. Are there not any services in Kapiti that can help with disposing of a dead sheep?

Frank

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2 months 3 weeks ago #544203 by Sue

Probably not much help on a public holiday but some Councils have areas which they can bury dead stuff and cover it up quickly- for a fee!
Also do you know any farms with a bigger area you could dig a hole in?


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

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2 months 3 weeks ago #544204 by spark

terralsb wrote: [SNIP] We were told to dig a hole but the ground is not the way that this is easy. [SNIP]

If you have a suitable location (no access by dogs!), you might be able to compost the dead sheep:
http://magazine.manuremanager.com/publication/?i=41617&article_id=432525

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2 months 3 weeks ago #544205 by Ruth

How close are the nearest neighbours as the wind blows? As above for if there are no dogs.

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2 months 3 weeks ago #544208 by jeannielea

If you decide on composting add some lime on top as it will speed up the process and help eliminate smell. We once had a dead cow and no-one to help with disposal (yes, holidays again) so dug a shallow hole and using rubbish etc we burnt it. Not such a good way to go but faster than compost and there were no neighbours nearby

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544231 by muri

Are you able to set fire to it. That is one way of dealing with it if you dont have a fire ban.

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544232 by terralsb

A fire needs in our area a permit of the council. At the moment we contact some vets that handle farm animals, hoping someone can pick the sheep up.

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544241 by max2

Dare I say it but in current conditions, its going to decompose rather quickly so even for ''anyone'' picking it up, its joints will give way and be a totally unpleasant job. If it was mine and in an out of the way area, I would leave it or cover it with grass clippings or soil if the sight is offensive.

If it is in an obvious spot and causing distress I'm afraid you are going to have to start digging nearby with the aim of rolling the body into some sort of grave, however shallow.

Unfortunately where there is life, there is death. Sorry if its your first one, its not an easy or pleasant task. x

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544243 by Ahudot

One of my dear old girls died on Christmas Eve a few years ago when the ground looked like concrete, but I was surprised once I started digging how the soil softened once I got down a bit. You may have additional problems like rocks, roots, etc, but most of the country has had reasonably recent rain and the job may be easier than you think.

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544247 by Mudlerk

I would agree with Ahudot that digging the hole is the way to go...simplest/easiest.

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2 months 2 weeks ago #544251 by LongRidge

Phone around the neighbours to see if anyone has a tractor with a front digging bucket. His efforts will cost about $80 per hour, so about $30.
Iwould dig a hole by taking water down to beside the sheep and pour it onto the ground to soften it. You might need 40 litres.
I'm digging post holes at the moment, and the ground is very good for that. The topsoil is dry, but about 30 cm down it starts to get damp.
Perhaps ask a neighbours teenager if they wish to earn $30.

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