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Topic-icon tree identification

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541189 by tahunakuaka

Can anyone identify this tree for me please? It is in part of the paddock that has edible fruit trees, although old large ornamentals are nearby. It is deciduous and is visited often by tui. I am new to this area of N.Z (Taumarunui is the closest town 40kms east).having lived in the North and Far North since coming to this country 60 yrs ago, and am not familiar with several of the trees on this property.

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541198 by tonic

Looks like a flowering cherry? They grow wild and prolifically here in the BOP.

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541199 by Stikkibeek

Yes a flowering cherry. Mine has just started flowering and has still got lovely red autumn leaves on that it hasn't dropped. They do fruit and birds like the fruit hence the numbers that will pop up in unexpected places. They are quite a nice specimen tree.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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8 months 3 weeks ago #541205 by tahunakuaka

Thank you, exotic ornamentals are not normally my "thing" especially in a paddock, but the Tuis like it and if the Kukupa like the fruit, then it will stay. There is a 6 hectare mature bush DOC senic reserve directly on my boundary and about a dozen huge trees on my side of the fence. ,There did not seem to be any birds around when I came here six months ago, but after despatching a magpie in full view of the whole colony, the magpies decamped across the road to neighbouring farmland. Since then the bird life has become more varied and noticable. Three wild cats and one possum have also been disposed of so I suppose that also helps (my excuse to myself).

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541206 by Furball

If you know of a local garden centre you might want to take some good photos of your tree in for a full identification, as it might be Taiwan Cherry. (Don't take actual samples to them as they may carry pests and the garden centre will get grumpy with you) There are some sterile varieties of Taiwan cherry, but the fertile ones are an invasive weed. See the weedbusters entry: www.weedbusters.org.nz/weed-information/prunus-campanulata/59/

Good on you for dealing to the cats and possums. If you like having the tui around and want to facilitate their breeding success, you may want to think about a comprehensive rat control programme on your land, as tui nests are heavily predated by rats. Rat control will benefit all the other birds, too.

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541211 by Stikkibeek

If it is the Taiwan cherry, they do make very good firewood. They were planted en-mass along the street where we used to live, which is where this one i have, came from.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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8 months 3 weeks ago #541212 by Mudlerk

Cherry trees, and in fact all of the prunus [i.e., most stonefruit], have lovely wood. Woodturners love it!

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541213 by Ruth

tahunakuaka wrote: Thank you, exotic ornamentals are not normally my "thing" especially in a paddock, but the Tuis like it and if the Kukupa like the fruit, ....

... is the very reason such trees need to be approached with caution. Kukupa love the fruit of Acmena/Monkey Apple and those trees will, within the next few decades, start to take over the native bush around the areas they've been used as hedges and wind-breaks. One of the Flowering Cherry trees is similarly becoming a weed species around here.

Last Edit: 8 months 3 weeks ago by Ruth.
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8 months 3 weeks ago #541214 by tonic

The flowering cherries here come up in any ungrazed area, fenced off trees,stream edges etc. They grow back when chopped down also so need treating to kill. My husband chopped a big one down and left it so become overgrown, it must have grown roots from the trunk along the ground as it is now a line of about a dozen trees all growing from the one cut off trunk. They are very determined to survive!

The birds like them, and so do I, but they have become a nuisance now with dozens growing on our small block.

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541215 by tahunakuaka

O.K. - Thank you Ruth and Tonic, I was conflicted about this tree after furbaIll's post, now it will come down for firewood after flowering but before fruiting. I hope that will fix any danger of spreading. The paddock will be left fallow until the spring of 2019, as the three sheep have recently been processed into the family's freezers.

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541221 by tonic

You might get some seedlings come up from previous years seeds, but none survive in our grazed areas so when you get animals back in 2019 they will clean them up.

I was looking about as we drove through Tauranga today and noticed the pretty pink flowering cherry trees growing in all the native planted roadside areas, alongside the estuary, in all the council planted areas etc. Pretty but definitely a problem.

Last Edit: 8 months 3 weeks ago by tonic.
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8 months 3 weeks ago #541243 by Mudlerk

When I was a kid in southern Ohio [have to add the 'southern' to admit we're Appalachian hillbillies, not civilized northern Ohioans], we had a terror of 'wild' cherry trees; a native species. Cows usually would not eat green leaves, which are poisonous, but they would if you cut down the tree and the leaves wilted [still poisonous].

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8 months 3 weeks ago #541245 by Stikkibeek

Mudlerk wrote: When I was a kid in southern Ohio [have to add the 'southern' to admit we're Appalachian hillbillies, not civilized northern Ohioans], we had a terror of 'wild' cherry trees; a native species. Cows usually would not eat green leaves, which are poisonous, but they would if you cut down the tree and the leaves wilted [still poisonous].

Perhaps that's the real reason George Washington chopped it down! :evil:


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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8 months 2 weeks ago #541276 by Mudlerk

Round home, where old George spent much of his youth murdering relatively civilized natives, stealing their land and illegally selling it off to other barbaric whites, lots of people reckon he lied and rewrote the story as an adult. Thank heaven he was old and tired enough to turn down the monarchy...

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