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Topic-icon roof cleaning in Waikato

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1 year 1 month ago #539090 by wendy2011

Hi

We have stayed on a lifestyle block for 4 years now, and we need somebody to clean the roof for us.

Asked around a bit, all roof cleaners seem to use spray treatment on roof, but I am concerned the chemical will get into the water tank and poison the water we drink. I know the downpipe can be disconnected during washing or the first few rains for the extra chemical to be washed off, then we can connect the downpipe again so roof water can get into the water tank but I still feel uncomfortable with the idea that the debris of the mould or moss from the roof will get into the water tank and it might still bring in the chemicals.

What do you normally do with the roof cleaning?

Looking forward to getting some advice.

Thanks. :)

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1 year 1 month ago #539092 by max2

Generally speaking when we used to do it, it was because people wanted the algae taken off their roofs so we would spray on wet N forget during the summer months and advise the owners to disconnect their downpipes until after the first decent rain.

If we are cleaning a roof with a view to re-painting it, then only high pressure water (this can be tricky for some rural pumps) is used.

As we no longer clean roofs (too busy) Im currently trying to find you the business card for a fellow around the Pukekohe area. Not sure what area he travels but on our community page is there another fellow who will hydro clean anything too.

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1 year 1 month ago #539093 by max2

Here we go: Pro Roof Renovator Tony Gugich - 027 253 0122 or 09 236 6986

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1 year 1 month ago #539094 by iSor

We’ve had the roof cleaned probably every four or five years with the chemical treatment. They say wait for three or four decent rains to wash it out of the by-pass pipes by which time when you get the next rainfall any residual chemical will have been safely diluted by a decent amount of water filling the tanks... theoretically. Some people may be sensitive to the chemical and a water test may reveal what’s actually in the water before you drink it if you are concerned.

We found in some winters, in which very little rain fell, we were close to running out of water waiting for the roof to be sufficiently rinsed, actually we did run out once because someone forgot to plug up the by-pass pipes in time, so we had to buy a tank of delivered spring water which was ok.
Anyway, that’s just our experience after twenty years out here but ask your neighbours who they use because you won’t be the only one with concerns in your area.

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1 year 1 month ago #539097 by Kilmoon

I have one question....what the hell are all your roofs made of that you need to chemically clean them? And what on earth are you trying to get off?

Good lord, even when I repainted ours (good old 1970s corrugated iron) and it was down to bare metal as all the paint had worn off, there wasn't any lichen or crap growing on it, nor was there any rust anywhere. And this was a roof that hadn't been touched since its original painting in the late 1970s. So one afternoon spent water blasting off the remaining paint cleaned the roof for repainting. Even years later nothing is growing on it.

So I ask again, what the hell are your roofs made of?
I ask merely so I can stay away from obviously junk products as we intend to rebuild sometime in the next decade. We have been told to have the old iron carefully taken down as apparently it's worth its weight in gold and we could have a good bidding war as they just don't make corrugated iron that thick (or good) anymore.

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1 year 1 month ago #539098 by Furball

I dunno what other people's are made of - mine's colorsteel, and all I needed to get removed was lichen (albeit 10 years thick layers of lichen) and dust. I also use the roof for my water collection, so I called the Kowhai guys, and they were very happy to do a plain waterblast without any chemicals. Mine came up perfect, and there certainly wasn't any need for chemicals.

I don't know why they don't specifically advertise it, (a plain water blast) but they certainly do it - maybe they tout the "chemical treatment" for hypochondriac townies who feel their roof is somehow cleaner after chemicals?

Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by Furball.
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1 year 1 month ago #539101 by max2

Iv'e not yet seen any of our neighbours clean their roofs either, although the odd wall definitely. We do ours because we can and because we are up there soaping and rinsing our solar panels.

Roofs are filthy things, esp. when you live near market gardens. Hubby is a roofer and I see the state of his clothes every afternoon. Its probably why we don't collect the water than runs off our roof, rather we use spring water readily available on our property.

But a lot of people dislike the look of lichen and feels its ''dirty'' when ultimately its growing because the immediate environment is clean/healthy. I guess its no different to people who wear make up, its a cosmetic thing.

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1 year 1 month ago #539109 by wendy2011

Just got a quote from a roof cleaner, the washing costs nearly double the price, but I will probably go with the plain water washing, so I don't have concern about the chemicals.

I was told with chemicals, the roof will stay free of lichen for longer time and it is cheaper to use chemicals.

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1 year 1 month ago #539110 by wendy2011

our roof is also made of colour steel, probably it depends on where you live, in Waikato, the humidity sometimes is high and I do see lichen growing on the roof this year, so need to get rid of that. Even somewhere outside the gutter, we see lichen or mould.

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1 year 1 month ago #539112 by iSor

Our previous roof was made of terracotta tiles, which were never sealed when new, hence they absorbed a lot of water and lichen loved it.
Some time after the roof was professionally (chemically) cleaned and sealed it didn’t grow so much lichen. It shouldn’t have grown any really but because the “professional” company applied the sealant on a windy day (!!!) and when I was not there, half of the sealant ended up elsewhere, eg on the ground, because I could see where the outdoor terrace tiles were dotted with sealant and repelled water.

Idiots, (and so were we) and then they tried to come back and get repeat business but I told them where to go after they tried to fix the problem and then my husband did the spraying himself after that.

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1 year 1 month ago #539119 by Hawkspur

Lichens will grow anywhere, but need some humidity and clean air.
If you live away from high pollution, with humid air, you will get lichen growing on your roof. It will be more humid if the roof is shaded, so overhanging trees increase the growth of lichen.
Take some comfort from the fact that your air is clean too.
I have lichen growing on my car. :cheer:

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