Sheep

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5 months 3 weeks ago #559212 by Lammetjie
Sheep was created by Lammetjie
Hi,  we have a neighbour requesting to graze and breed sheep on our land.  We have no idea what to charge them.  Any advice would be welcome.  Thanks very much.   

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5 months 3 weeks ago - 5 months 3 weeks ago #559213 by tonybaker
Replied by tonybaker on topic Sheep
are your fences/gates up to it, is there reliable water and how many sheep can your land carry in a dry summer ? Will he return the pasture to its original condition. I would call your local stock agent about prices.
 

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
Last edit: 5 months 3 weeks ago by tonybaker.

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5 months 3 weeks ago #559215 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Sheep
I pay to graze other peoples LSBs, and work on the principle that half the profit is mine and half the landowners.
Here in Nelson, lambs are not as valuable as in the North Island. This year I would guess that the average lamb will be worth about $120 each. Guess that each ewe will have about 1.25 lambs each that reach weaning, so the ewe makes $180 per 365 day year, so 50 cents per day per ewe. Half of that is 25 cents per day for you. Doing it this way means that if he runs 730 sheep four days of the year is the same as running 8 sheep for 365 days.
With me paying this amount, I expect him (ie you) to do weed control, liming and fertiliser, provide water, not permit his family or dogs on the pasture at any time except after notification that his jobs are being done. If he makes hay out of spare grass rather than running his sheep, the about $2.50 per bale for the grass.
It is to your benefit to pay for weed control and fertilising, as that will mean that he can run more animals for longer. He can also probably do these jobs when his own pasture is being maintained, so can charge you a reasonable rate.
When I am leasing land I attempt to return it to the same soil fertility as I got it, so I do a soil test at the start of the lease and at the end.
Remember that when leasing land it is like leasing a house or car, so you have no rights to go onto it nor to do things to it.

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