Topic-icon Modest Lifestyle in Seddon

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29 Sep 2016 07:22 #525990 by sandgrubber

Hi, all
You could think of me as a latecomer in the US hippie migration of the 60s. I'm 67, retired, and have thought about coming to NZ for decades. They only let me in cause I hold an Ozzie passport :)
I just contracted to buy a 100 yr old house and 3/4 acre in Seddon, Marlborough. Small. But it has been a lifestyle place for many decades. 42 mature fruit trees, plus grapes and boysenberries. Shredding galore, including a little sheep shed. Greenhouse. And in town so I can walk to the grocery, and public transport is available to Blenheim, Nelson, Christchurch and beyond.

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29 Sep 2016 08:27 #525992 by muri

Welcome, what an awesome little house, looks like you will be set for your retirement

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29 Sep 2016 09:54 #525995 by Olivia

Hello and welcome!

Looks like a character filled home and a nice piece of land to try all sorts of ideas :)
All the best!


Proud Farmer of a little family, little lifestyle block and a little house in the township.
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29 Sep 2016 10:04 #525997 by Gracelands

That does look like a little piece of heaven, in a great part of the country, too. Do you plan to run any animals, or just live off those 42 fruit trees? Welcome to the site, and to NZ.


"Just living is not enough. One must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower."
Hans Christian Anderson
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30 Sep 2016 15:18 #526027 by sandgrubber

All in favor of animals, but haven't decided what sort. I'd love to keep a milk goat, but it may take some figuring to prevent a goat from destroying the trees. Alt, could do a few sheepies. I've never had sheep, but I'm sure there are plenty of neighbors with experience. Or perhaps pigs to eat the fruit I can't process . . . I haven't yet figured out how touchy Kiwis are about keeping pigs in town; I reckon, get to know the neighbors first. .

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30 Sep 2016 18:51 #526030 by spark

Hi sandgrubber,

Some councils have bylaws regarding the keeping of pigs, often regarding things such as the zoning of the land, the number of pigs that can be kept and distance between a pig sty and a house or the boundary with the neighbour, etc (CAFO type operations have given pig-keeping a bad name...).

An issue that you may run into with homekill, if you want to do that with your livestock, is that some councils have bylaws that prohibit the slaughter of stock for human consumption in certain land zones (eg residential) except at a licensed abattoir. Whilst it might be quite safe for a captive bolt stunner to be used in your back yard (no projectile hazard), "townies" probably won't appreciate the spectacle.

Cheers

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03 Oct 2016 11:09 #526153 by LongRidge

.... but because there are no "townies" living in Seddon you should be OK with keeping what you want :) . Seddon is a cluster of country households living in a small area :) .
You may have problems with how much water that you are permitted to use in mid and late summer. When water restrictions come on, it is really easy to see who is stealing water. But it is remotely possible that Seddon never has water restrictions, so something to ask the neighbours about.

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03 Oct 2016 19:24 #526168 by spark

One possible solution to water restrictions in dry summers is to put in a big rainwater tank, plumb your house's guttering into it, and use a small pump to provide irrigation water (when town supply water restrictions are in force). A big rainwater tank will also reduce the loading that your house places on the council storm water system since you will be capturing rainwater instead of sending it down the drain :)

A building consent is not required to install a water tank of up to 35,000 L capacity, provided that said tank rests on the ground - see page 69:
http://www.building.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/projects-and-consents/building-work-consent-not-required-guidance-3rd-edition.pdf

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04 Oct 2016 08:57 #526183 by muri

Spark, thats really interesting re no building consents but perhaps you require planning consent?
Auckland City does not permit the instillation of water tanks I think over 50 litres, because I understand they also own Watercare the provider of water to most homes. So if you want to install a tank to water your garden, you need to apply to council!
This is public policy gone awry in my mind.
Interestingly I think new houses are now required in Auckland City to instal water tanks to ease the storm water situation. I know in Hobsonville, west auckland which has a high water table, all the units have water tanks installed under their houses - the sites are too small to take above ground water tanks

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04 Oct 2016 19:43 #526221 by spark

muri wrote: Spark, thats really interesting re no building consents but perhaps you require planning consent?
Auckland City does not permit the instillation of water tanks I think over 50 litres, because I understand they also own Watercare the provider of water to most homes. So if you want to install a tank to water your garden, you need to apply to council!
This is public policy gone awry in my mind.
Interestingly I think new houses are now required in Auckland City to instal water tanks to ease the storm water situation. I know in Hobsonville, west auckland which has a high water table, all the units have water tanks installed under their houses - the sites are too small to take above ground water tanks


Whilst central government has decreed an exemption from a building permit, you are still obliged to follow your council's district plan...
In the case of Auckland, I suspect that the restriction on water tanks over 50L is to do with "aesthetics" - townies who have just dropped $1M on a handkerchief with a house on it (cheek by jowl?) don't want the view out of their window mostly filled by the side of the neighbour's water tank.

Regarding rainwater tanks under new homes in Hobsonville, are the residents allowed to actually use the rain water that they capture, or does the council require them to slowly send it down the drain?

If residents are forced to drain their rain water (and are banned from using it, even if they put in treatment equipment appropriate for the intended use of the water), then I would be very suspicious about the council, water company and conflict of interest...

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04 Oct 2016 22:39 #526223 by Stikkibeek

I think they's be happy to charge the resident a water rate assessed on the size of the tank and the probable rainfall. I know watercare services charge for water from new bores, on the assumption they own the water right. Personally I think that an absolute cheek if the water is within your own boundary.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last Edit: 04 Oct 2016 22:40 by Stikkibeek.

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04 Oct 2016 23:36 #526224 by spark

It appears that Watercare only want to charge for rain or bore water that is likely to go down their sewer after you have used it:
https://www.watercare.co.nz/common-content/water-meters/rain_tank_meter/Pages/Rain%20tank%20water%20meter.aspx

Presumably their wastewater only tariff is cheaper than their metered town supply + wastewater tariff?

As far as charging per volume taken from a bore, I understand the need for regulation (aquifers are shared resources and all that) but I was under the impression that it is basically a rubber stamping exercise to get resource consent to take up to 2000 L/day from a bore for domestic purposes and or drinking water for livestock (deemed to be a permitted activity in the RMA or something like that). Some large (read commercial, industrial and irrigation) bores are fitted with water meters - usually to make sure that the bore owners stay within the terms of their resource consents...

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25 Oct 2016 16:50 #526840 by tonybaker

great shots of the house, Seddon is in the middle of vineyards now and is becoming trendy after aeons of poverty stricken sheep farming!
I bet the rates are quite high as Seddon has water supply issues and new sources are being explored. The council website seems to encourage water tanks,- 'Collect rainwater from the roof for garden use by intercepting the downpipe (spouting) flows and storing in a tank, preferably filtered first. If a ground-supported outdoor water tank has capacity over 25,000 litres you will need to use a registered plumber and get a Building Consent, and similarly if the base is more than 2 metres above the ground and it exceeds 2,000 litres capacity. If it is over 2.5 metres in height and over 5,000 litres capacity it will be noticeable by neighbours and you might also need a Resource Consent –. The trick would be to use several smaller tanks then you can do it yourself. I can't imagine you will have any trouble with the neighbours.
It is quite common to have the odd sheep to keep the grass down, but goats have a habit of escaping and then you are in trouble with the neighbours.
You are lucky to be living almost within walking distance of our best winery, Yealands Estate
Good luck and Kia Ora mate!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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26 Oct 2016 08:46 #526862 by Mudlerk

You mentioned a goat for milking. Nowadays you can get milk sheep...might they prove a better alternative? Easy to find someone who will let you put them in with their ram for a few weeks, less challenge to fencing, and lovely lamb for the table. According to a friend of mine who has them, you'll need at least a couple, as you have to share milk with their youngsters. They usually have several, he says.

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27 Oct 2016 11:02 #526922 by sandgrubber

Great idea! I've heard of sheep's milk cheese, but never of sheep bred for milking. I'll have to google it . . . do you have any suggestions about where in NZ one can find such sheep?

Some trivia on the topic of building codes and water tanks: in much of rural California, you MUST have 10,000 gallons (~37,500 l) of tank water (generally from a bore) to get a building permit. That's so the fire tankers can fill up if you property has to be defended.

Last Edit: 27 Oct 2016 11:07 by sandgrubber. Reason: additional thought

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27 Oct 2016 14:55 #526930 by tonybaker

I wouldn't worry about storing water in case of fire - you will be able to throw bottles of wine at it!!

Get settled in and wait a while before thinking about animals. Milking sheep is not much fun and you need small hands and good eyesight!
Just get an old ewe to keep the grass down or buy a ride on mower.

Those fruit trees look like they could do with a good prune and maybe grafting over with different cultivars.

I would get a good vege garden going first. You can get free horse manure from the racetrack in Blenheim.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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27 Oct 2016 19:18 #526935 by Hawkspur

sandgrubber wrote: ...Some trivia on the topic of building codes and water tanks: in much of rural California, you MUST have 10,000 gallons (~37,500 l) of tank water (generally from a bore) to get a building permit. That's so the fire tankers can fill up if you property has to be defended.

We have similar requirements here for fire-fighting water supplies. It depends on the Council, but the Fire Service has a code of practice that guides most Council's requirements. For new houses with non-reticulated water, 45,000 L and a suitable connection is required, but in practice this can be the house supply, which is not always full...

Last Edit: 27 Oct 2016 19:19 by Hawkspur.
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28 Oct 2016 07:21 #526944 by muri

Kaipara District, immediately north of Auckland Council area, require an extra 25,000 litre tank for fire fighting also.
I wonder how many people use up thjis tank in times of drought when their first tank dries out and who comes and checks.
I think an alternative and accessible water source is also acceptable

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28 Oct 2016 07:43 #526946 by sandgrubber

I'd be willing to bet that they only check up AFTER there's been a fire and the fire crews ended out sucking bottom ;)

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29 Oct 2016 18:59 #526984 by rivercottage

Welcome to New Zealand and congratulations on realising your dream.
Your place looks lovely, and it seems that you have many opportunities with your property. You will find so much helpful information on this site so make good use of the search function.

BTW, if your fruit trees include apples and pears, and if you drink alcohol, it is very easy (and fairly cheap) to make your own cider - which would be so much better than feeding sheep. While we're on the subject of alcohol, did you know that it is LEGAL to brew your own spirits in NZ - quite surprising to many people. Of course, you're not allowed to sell it just like you are not allowed to sell home-killed meat.

Just to mention that geese and ducks eat a heck of a lot of grass and that could be an alternative to sheep - ducks really need a pond though, and I'm not sure about geese.

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29 Oct 2016 22:55 #526992 by sandgrubber

Useful thoughts.
I'm bringing my bottling gear : I've brewed beer in the past, and understand hops does well in NZ. In my hippie days we made cider from apples from an abandoned orchard . . . it wasn't real good and fermentation was hit or miss . . . but I imagine there are recipes and manuals around to help bring up the quality. Is it worth picking up a fruit crusher and press from the US, or are they easy come-by in NZ. Here's a site that has a good collection ( pleasanthillgrain.com/appliances/apple-wine-presses ).

Last Edit: 29 Oct 2016 23:07 by sandgrubber.

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29 Oct 2016 23:48 #526994 by Stikkibeek

You'd do better to pick up what you need from US, but you will have to pay GST on it on entry to NZ. At least you won't have to pay tax in America if it's going out of the country.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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30 Oct 2016 09:47 #526998 by Mudlerk

For information on where you can get milk sheep you could contact Jill Galloway, the rural reporter for the Manawatu Standard or Craig Prichard at Massey University [he's my friend who has some]. A propos the building regs in the U.S.; depends on where you are: When my wife was on sabbatical at Ohio University, [near my birthplace] one of her colleagues was told by the local authority that they didn't need a septic tank for their new house, because 'you don't need to worry if you're out in the county'!

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30 Oct 2016 19:00 #527009 by Hawkspur

muri - yes, an alternative supply is acceptable. If your supply can deliver 25 L/s for 30 min. you don't have to have a storage tank. Other requirements are that the connection be close to a hardstanding area suitable for a 20T vehicle, (so the fire engine won't get bogged down).
There are access requirements too, which our property won't meet, so I'm intending to install domestic fire sprinklers, but a bush fire would be a nightmare in this valley.
Mudlerk, a friend of mine lived in an area in the USA with more flexible rules for building than here - they didn't need to meet any rules for their dwelling, because it didn't touch the ground. It was a treehouse.
Stikkibeek, would you have to pay GST on it if it came over as part of shipping all the household stuff?

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30 Oct 2016 23:28 #527027 by Stikkibeek

Only if brand new I think and there is a value limit, but the Government were looking at that recently. Don't know the outcome.


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31 Oct 2016 02:01 #527028 by sandgrubber

Lots of discussion of this on enz.org (emmigration to NZ). No one seems to have hit a limit. Second hand stuff can be imported with a few exceptions (eg., caravans). I'll declare a few new things in as 'new' and pay duty. Not a problem. Often you can purchase second hand; and if I try a press and crusher out before importing them, they will be used and I can make sure they have a few scratches and look used. I think there are some rules about how long you are supposed to have owned something you import. This is taken seriously for autos and big ticket items shipped with original packing, but would be impossible to enforce for household goods. How on earth can they tell what you bought from an op shop and what you had owned for years?

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31 Oct 2016 14:37 #527035 by Mudlerk

When I was in Operation Deepfreeze [the US Navy Antarctic support programme], some of the guys used to import new autos and then sell them six months later, before we went back to Washington. One of them told me that you had to keep them for six months before you could flog them off as 'used'. Mind you, all this was 50 years ago!! Even with the shipping they turned a 50% profit, because it was so hard to get new cars from overseas...you had to have 'overseas funds'.

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31 Oct 2016 16:45 #527044 by tonybaker

sandgrubber wrote: Useful thoughts.
I'm bringing my bottling gear : I've brewed beer in the past, and understand hops does well in NZ. In my hippie days we made cider from apples from an abandoned orchard . . . it wasn't real good and fermentation was hit or miss . . . but I imagine there are recipes and manuals around to help bring up the quality. Is it worth picking up a fruit crusher and press from the US, or are they easy come-by in NZ. Here's a site that has a good collection ( pleasanthillgrain.com/appliances/apple-wine-presses ).

Don't bother, I use a garden shredder for apples and made my own press with a few bits of metal and a car jack. Both work well. Hops grow well here but plants are difficult to obtain, it's hardly worth the bother of growing them.
As far as fire fighting goes, you are only minutes away from the fire station and there are hydrants in the street so you don't need storage!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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07 Nov 2016 20:34 #527302 by LongRidge

You might have problems importing used juice presses, and brewing gear, so check about those.

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21 Nov 2016 20:32 #527775 by tonybaker

hey Sandgrubber, hope you are ok down there in Seddon? I guess your pioneer house stood up well to the shaking?


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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21 Mar 2017 05:43 #531257 by sandgrubber

Have moved in at long last. How the weeds have grown! Meeting neighbors, who are great and helpful. One wants to collect the loads of dropped fruit for her pigs. Another is loaning me simple tools ...Mine are all in a sea container on the ocean somewhere. Lots of work to do. Everything is overgrown. Trees need pruning, wisteria trying to eat the house, boards on back porch are pretty rotten, irrigation system is cobbled together and falling apart. It's gonna be fun!

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21 Mar 2017 08:10 #531259 by tonybaker

welcome back. Sandgrubber! It don't sound too bad?
Forget the irrigation it will rain from now on! The rotten boards in the porch will make good firewood for the cold nights to come. Those fruit trees are probably due for the chop anyway, more firewood.......
Get yourself down to Yealands Winery and enjoy a bit of free wine tasting.
Stay cool and the neighbours will help.
PS. don't complain about the high prices here, we know about it and accept it as the price (pun) to pay for living in paradise...get yourself a trade account at Bunnings and you will get a little bit back. You just tell them you are doing house renovations, they don't check.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
Last Edit: 21 Mar 2017 08:19 by tonybaker.
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21 Mar 2017 09:43 #531261 by Stikkibeek

Apart from some judicious pruning of the fruit trees, I wouldn't give them the chop before establishing what they are. Your own bottle fruit over the winter every year will be far more warming than a few fires. Welcome to NZ. Sounds as if retirement is not a word in your dictionary, but that's a good thing. it keeps you fit :cheer:


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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29 Mar 2017 07:37 #531401 by sandgrubber

The only high prices I'm complaining about are those for fruit and veg, and that won't be a problem for long. I've already got lettuce, rocket, leeks, salad onions and various Brassicas sprouting, plus I have freezer space and should be able to do something with these mountains of peaches and little apples. Found a good juicer on TradeMe, that should help. Going to have a go at making kim-chee when the Chinese cabbage gets big enough to harvest. Yealands gives discounts to locals, so the vino is taken care of.

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29 Mar 2017 08:55 #531405 by tonybaker

well done! you are on the way to becoming a good Kiwi! Now is a good time to sow onion seeds in trays, red and white. We juice apples using a garden shredder and a small wine press. We then let it settle for a few days in the fridge and rack it off into plastic bottles for the freezer. With your juicer you can make beetroot and apple juice, very tasty and nutritious.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
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