Topic-icon Young Bull -breeding age

  • Kevin and Perlita Morgan
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03 Dec 2010 15:21 #25595 by Kevin and Perlita Morgan

Hi At what age would you expect a young bull to be able to successfully breed ,Its a Jersey breed
Cheers Kevin

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03 Dec 2010 15:55 #357759 by Stu_R

no experience with cattle
but :) .. my akita dog got his friend up the duff at 14 months old
My lil feral goat got his mum up the duff at about 7 months old
17 and 19 borrowed ram lambs , got my 3 ewes preggers at about 9monhs old
so am guessing anything after 1 year old should be fine for a bull ... but i am only guessing based on what i have experience with :)


5 retired Greyhounds ( Bridgette , Lilly, GoGo,Sam and now Lenny) 15 friendly sheep all of whom are named and come when you call them :) , 2 goats, Mollie and Eee Bee :
Olive trees , .. old bugger doing the best he can with no money or land :)

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03 Dec 2010 16:13 #357764 by Isla

Mine were born in October last year and will go out with the cows when they're 14-15 months old. They're already pushing 500kg which should be about 60% of their mature weight. Is that any help? I won't give them heaps of cows, no more than about 25 at max per bull.

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  • Sue
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03 Dec 2010 17:33 #357776 by Sue

Well if Jersey heifers can get in calf at 6 months old, I'm sure Jersey bulls will be just as fertile!

It would depend how tall the cows are no doubt ;-)


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

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  • Kevin and Perlita Morgan
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03 Dec 2010 18:19 #357782 by Kevin and Perlita Morgan

Yes he is a bit short in the legs at the moment (8.5 months old )Therefore about 6 inches short of the mark ,Mainly interested because i read on the internet ,about 7 months old ,they are capeable of breeding,He will probably be high enough at 12 to 15 months
Cheers Kevin

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03 Dec 2010 19:06 #357784 by ronnie

Sue;348230 wrote: Well if Jersey heifers can get in calf at 6 months old, I'm sure Jersey bulls will be just as fertile!

It would depend how tall the cows are no doubt ;-)


Reminds me of one year, my neighbour took great delight in continuously laughing at my bull, who happened to be a jersey yearling and much shorter than my girls. All the usual jokes about following the cows around with a ladder ready for him to climb up, standing on hay bales, making the girls walk downhill, etc etc etc.

Wiped to smile off his face about 9 months later when every single cow produced a wonderful, healthy calf without any assistance at all.

So I guess he managed somehow, despite his short comings [:0] :D :D :cool:

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04 Dec 2010 00:03 #357811 by Ronney

Is this the special little chap? I would say that he's ready to go now so long as he can do the hop, skip and jump to get up there :D If your Jerseys tend towards the typical Jersey rather than the bigger, American breed-ups, he should be able to manage as a yearling and to that end Jan (the other Ronnie) is quite right. The Jersey of both sexes is precocious.

Another photo? At nearly 9 months he will be looking quite the part I should think.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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04 Dec 2010 02:42 #357814 by Kevin and Perlita Morgan

Hi Perlita and I were checking the breeding of our Heifers,this afternoon and found that there were 2 that we hadnt AIed,so we decided that Perlita should palpate ,to our surprice the both were pregnant ,So he been able to go that extra mile ,he is about 9 months now
Cheers

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05 Dec 2010 23:42 #358015 by Inger

I would use him at a year old. He's probably fertile at 5 or 6 months. If he's being used over heifers, I can't see any problems at all.


135 acres in Bay of Islands, including around 90 acres of Native Bush. Which is currently For Sale.
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06 Dec 2010 17:23 #358120 by LongRidge

I bought some pregnant yearling cows that had been run in a mob with the same aged rigs (some of the steers hadn't been castrated properly), so they would have been mated by a 6 month old male.
Breeding age is moderately genetically linked. If his mother calved at a young age and his father sired when young then he might be more likely to be fertile at a young age. In NZ, early calving of dairy breeds has been actively selected for, so in NZ dairy breeds can and do get pregnant while very young.
We use our replacement beef bulls as 15 month olds, and they have all successfully done the job.

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06 Dec 2010 18:26 #358132 by clarry

LongRidge;348610 wrote: In NZ, early calving of dairy breeds has been actively selected for, so in NZ dairy breeds can and do get pregnant while very young.


:D :D Bulls an hfrs were separated at weaning 100kgs in our herd.
Had some time on heifer grazing block 900head, did see the result of these unplanned matings from yearlings that arrived on farm incalf...........prob from some beefie the farmer had running with mob before they send away to grazing[:0]

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09 Dec 2010 16:08 #358528 by Althea from Middelmost

Don't always blame the young bull for any hanky panky ... the lengths some cows will go to to give them a hand can be both ingenious and hilarious. Some are right tarts :).

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09 Dec 2010 21:47 #358579 by LongRidge

Had one of the calves that is still on her mum cycling yesterday. Only 3 to 4 months old, and everything except the bull was playing with her. I've never noticed a calf this precocious before ..... Fortunately the bull was in love with a big girl, so wasn't interested in the calf. Anyway, the bull is her father, and we all know that father bulls don't mate heifer daughters .... (yeah, right ....)

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10 Dec 2010 08:55 #358615 by igor

LR, my brother has had that sort of thing happen. He put the bull out to cover the nurse cows and a couple of the calves must have been cycling because they calved as yearlings. No real difficulty, just unexpected calves.

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