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weeds

Running the Farm : Weed of the month

What weeds should you tackle this month? These articles help you with the answer to that question. There are hundreds of other useful articles in our lifestyle file. If you're looking for something in particular then use the search box above. If not, then browse the article titles and see what there is to help you. If you can't find an answer here then why not ask in our discussion forums? One of the very friendly and helpful members is sure to be able to help you.

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Although blackberry (Rubus fruiticosus complex) is found in most districts of New Zealand it is mainly a problem weed in Northland, Central and Eastern districts of the North Island, Nelson and the West Coast.

Gorse (Ulex europaeus) is a spine bearing, nitrogen fixing bush.  Originally from southern Europe, gorse is now easily New Zealand’s most widespread and problematic brushweed. 

A perennial that is often found in damp pastures. The flowers are purple and will appear in late summer (Jan-Mar)

Redroot is the name given to a group of 3 closely related Amaranthus species and a fourth species that is similar to redroot is Amaranthus viridis – purple amaranth.

Gorse (Ulex europaeus) is a spine bearing, nitrogen fixing bush.  Originally from southern Europe, gorse is now easily New Zealand’s most widespread and problematic brushweed. 

blackberryAlthough blackberry is found in most districts of New Zealand it is mainly a problem weed in Northland, Central and Eastern districts of the North Island, Nelson and the West Coast.

inkweedA soft-wooded, bushy and leafy perennial that grows up to 2 metres tall or more. The flowers are green and are followed by dense cylindrical clusters of dark purple berries.

There are several species of dock that are commonly found in New Zealand pastures and crops.  Broad-leaved dock is the most common, however curled dock and fiddle docks are also very prevalent. 

chickweed3Chickweed (sometimes called field chickweed) is an annual that is low growing and sprawling and can grow up to 70cm across.

scotch thistleScotch and nodding thistles are common in New Zealand pastures.

hedge mustardHedge mustard is also sometimes referred to as wireweed or tumble weed.

Hemlock thrives in damp conditions and is commonly found throughout New Zealand in ditches and riverbeds as well as on banks and roadsides. This weed quickly establishes in waste areas where there is no other plant competition.

giant buttercupGiant Buttercup is a hairy perennial, with erect solid stems up to 1.5 m tall. It grows from a stout rhizome.

cali thistleA perennial thistle with far-creeping root system, each plant sending up many aerial shoots in the spring, which seed and die in the autumn.

Fathen is very common throughout New Zealand but is especially abundant in arable districts. Growing mainly in spring and summer, this erect weed can grow up to 2m tall.

Also commonly referred to as “Amaranthus”, these weeds are widely spread throughout New Zealand, and get their name from the reddish colour towards the base of the plant and tap root. They are commonly found in arable crops and can grow up to 1 metre high.

A perennial that is often found in damp pastures. The flowers are purple and will appear in late summer (Jan-Mar)

Spurrey is an erect or sprawling annual plant that can grow very densely and effect crop establishment. This weed is commonly found in cultivated land, gardens, roadways, bare ground and sand dunes. It is sometimes referred to as Yarr.

Ragwort is often a problem on cattle and horse properties as it is very poisonous. Sheep are less susceptible to ragwort poisoning but can suffer liver damage, which can eventually lead to death.

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