Angora goat farming diary

January

  • Shearing (where it applies).
  • Time to tidy up the flock and decide what you want to keep for next season. As feed always declines in the summer dry weather, there’s no point in keeping stock that won’t earn their keep next season.
  • Decisions made on bucks to be used, and keep them separated from does incase they trigger some early cycling.
  • If there are any signs of drought developing, make sure you have a plan to provide supplementary feed and a good water supply if things get worse.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
February
  • Shearing (where it applies).
  • Check does are not losing too much condition and if they are provide an improved diet.
  • Check with veterinarian regarding vaccinations needed for your property and flock. May be 5-in-1 or 10-in-1.
  • Health check all does and bucks on the property. Pay special attention to bucks which should have a veterinary check of reproductive organs and feet.
  • Make sure the bucks are in a safe paddock. Holding them within sight and smell of does will stimulate oestrus in does.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
March
  • Bucks joined with does (depending on area). There’s no point in kidding too early when feed shortage and bad weather will cause high kid mortality.
  • Avoid giving goats any chemical treatment, drench or pouron during mating or for six weeks afterwards incase of effect on embryo establishment.
April
  • Bucks out. Check that they have been effective by how many does return to oestrus. A mating harness will show this but make sure it fits properly and does not chafe the buck.
  • Feed bucks concentrates during mating to maintain body condition.
  • Avoid giving goats any chemical treatment, drench or pouron during mating or for six weeks afterwards incase of effect on embryo establishment.
May
  • Make sure bucks are cared for after mating and build up lost conditon before winter. Cull any that you don’t want to use again.
  • Check for lice during winter.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
June
  • Make sure does don’t lose too much body condition.
  • If they start to fade, get urgent veterinary help.
  • Does will be on maintenance feed but this is not planned starvation.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
July
  • Shearing (where it applies)
  • Make sure does don’t lose too much body condition.
  • Time to start to improve doe’s plane of nutrition.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
August
  • Shearing (where it applies).
  • Boost feed levels and make sure does don’t lose too much body condition.
  • Avoid drenching adult goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
  • Prepare does for kidding and check you have all the gear organised.
September
  • Kidding.
  • Provide what’s needed to maximise kid survival.
  • Recording. Tagging.
  • Feed supplements to ensure good lactation.
  • Check with veterinarian if any problems.
October
  • Docking and dehorning if desired.
  • Check growth of kids.
  • Discuss any health problems with your veterinarian.
  • Vaccinate if appropriate.
  • Make sure does don’t lose too much body condition.
  • Does will be on maintenance feed but this is not planned starvation.
  • Avoid drenching any goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
  • There should be no need to drench any kids as at this stage of life (up to 6m) their natural immune system is developing and any chemicals don’t help this. There is research evidences to show this.
November
  • Check that kids are growing well. Consult your veterinarian if they are not.
  • Make sure does don’t lose too much body condition.
  • Avoid drenching any goats unless there is a crisis confirmed with your veterinarian by a Faecal Egg Count (FEC).
December
  • Wean kids and make sure they are growing well, providing exra concentrate feed if appropriate.
  • Check vaccination needs with veterinarian.
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