Topic-icon Free range meat birds

  • nzgroovejet
  • nzgroovejet's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • New lsb member
  • Posts: 1
  • Thank you received: 0
05 Oct 2018 14:23 #542619 by nzgroovejet

Has anyone got any experience with growing free range meat chickens? Do they need to stay inside with heat for 5 weeks, or can they go out earlier? Do you limit their meat bird crumbles so they also forage? Thanks

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 13951
  • Thank you received: 351
05 Oct 2018 14:45 #542621 by LongRidge

When a farmer has free-range chickens but is not raising them commercially, the mother hen takes the chickens out of the nest very soon after hatching. I presume that your chicks do not have a mother, so you will have to teach them where their coop is by keeping them in and feeding them in it for a few days. In the longer term they will need to be regularly fed in the coop, and have their wings (one side only) trimmed. If you don't do this they will roost in trees so you will only be able to catch them with a gun.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 9488
  • Thank you received: 403
05 Oct 2018 14:58 #542622 by Stikkibeek

I've just put mine out in a coop which catches the sun and is sheltered. They are 4-5 weeks, not all fully feathered but there are 16 of them so if they can't snuggle together for warmth then there is something wrong with them. I will keep them in the coop for some time however as there are hawks around here in quite big numbers and they would be easy picking for a hawk. They won't be allowed to forage until they are considerably bigger.
Long wet grass would be an issue for 5 week old chicks and they'd quickly chill. I have been turning off the heat pad for about a week now during the day, so tonight will be the first time without it at all.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last Edit: 05 Oct 2018 14:59 by Stikkibeek.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
05 Oct 2018 19:59 #542626 by Sue

Yes meat bird chicks need heat just like any chicks of the same age, but as they feather up they can range further away from the heat source, as long as there is somewhere they can go back to, especially at night.

You can start weaning them off day time heat from 3 or 4 weeks old and if they have access to outside after this, provided it is a dry warmish day they will be fine. Five to 6 weeks, depending on night time temperatures they can be weaned off heat. Ideally their environmental temperature needs to be at least 15 to 20C so that they do not use up too much feed just keeping warm!

As regards feed- remember that meat bird crumbs do not have medication for coccidiosis, so after 4 weeks you should watch out for cocci-which is a parasite which is everywhere and they tend to pick up in warm, moist patches e.g. around drinkers. Make sure you have treatment on hand-like Coxiprol, as it can strike very quickly.

If they are commercial meat chicks and you want them to forage and be more mobile it is a good idea to cut down the amount you feed each day- or they will pig out and sit around in between. I'm just calculating a feeding programme for feeding meat chicks at the moment for an article in a certain magazine!

To slow down their growth it is an idea to feed Chick Starter, then Grower and then Meat crumbs just for the last few weeks but it depends what weight you want to grow to, how much you spend on feed and what age you plan to process them. As yours seem to be about 5 weeks old now it is probably not suitable to change them now though!


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.
Last Edit: 05 Oct 2018 20:02 by Sue.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Farmersden
  • Farmersden's Avatar
  • Offline
  • advanced lsb member
  • Posts: 339
  • Thank you received: 29
05 Oct 2018 20:58 #542628 by Farmersden

Our experience with meat chicks was horrifying, bought day old Ross cobb chicks and kept them under heat lamps as prescribed but losses were about third from them standing on each other etc. Then had to deal with the weight gain that left some unable to walk. We tried managing but struggled and ended up with some good size birds for the table but decided is not for us. Moved to slower growing old style meat n egg birds less fuss, less loss and good flavour and can be raised by mums not us!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 2181
  • Thank you received: 59
05 Oct 2018 21:31 #542631 by tonic

Farmersden, it sounds like you had a bad run! We had the occasional leg issue over several batches of Cobbs, and one instance of them piling up on a wet night and losing the one that ended up in the damp. However, I have never raised them inside, always under hens. It seems easier to me to have put them under a broody than have to worry about heating etc. I always waited till summer though as they grow too big to fit under the hen very quickly so it needs to be warm enough that snuggling into her feathers is warm enough after a couple of weeks. The mums do a good job of keeping them out of trouble, and puddles etc,. as they seem to have lost some survival smarts in their development!

The following user(s) said Thank You: Farmersden

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
06 Oct 2018 08:49 #542635 by Sue

Sounds like your chicks were too cold Farmersden if they piled on top of one another and suffocated. When rearing any chicks without a mother hen you have to be aware of where they might get stuck, get drowned, get too hot, get too cold and be one step ahead!

With regards feeding they are bred to eat and grow, so for the home grower to slow them down you need to feed them differently to just giving Meat bird or game bird crumbs ad lib from day one.

My long term/full time poultry job was to rear the parents-to-be of those fat little meat chickens and they had the potential to grow even more quickly-so to get them to breeding age and beyond was an art!

Lameness can be a problem with heavy birds whose weight gains faster than the cartiledge in their legs can harden to bone. Less feed and more excercise is the key. Don't have a brooder lamp or lights on 24 hours at the start. They need a dark period to be able to digest their food and rest-and then wake up and walk around and eat. Just snacking by the feeder with the lights on 24/7 does not do them any favours!

Rearing them under a hen, as others have said, can be the simplest way to rear meat chicks-and do not overfeed!

By the way-no such thing as Ross Cobb! They are two separate breeding companies that have their own strain of meat chicks, both sold in NZ-but by opposition companies. They are slightly different in some ways-but not to look at!
Here are their on line handbooks!
en.aviagen.com/assets/Tech_Center/Ross_B...andbook-2014i-EN.pdf

www.cobb-vantress.com/docs/default-sourc...management-guide.pdf

If anyone wants some tips on growing meat chicks, plus their target weight for age and feed consumption I suggest you read these- but remember they are written for large scale intensive growing conditions, however there are plenty of good points which can be applied to the lifestyle meat chicken rearer.


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Farmersden

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • John M
  • John M's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Black shedding sheep
  • Posts: 622
  • Thank you received: 12
07 Oct 2018 07:53 #542659 by John M

We have raised a few lots now, and the current batch is almost 8 weeks and we'll commence processing them tomorrow. We have 31 this time and have had no losses.

They are inside for the first 3-4 weeks under ceramic heat lambs in an ever increasing sized area. We observe their actions to guide us as to how they’re feeling. If bunching, they’re too cold, if spread out, too hot etc. we have the lamps at one end and food and water the other end. Seems to work well for us.

From a month, they get outside in a sheltered area during warm sunny days. By 6-7 weeks they often get to stay outside all the time, but we will bring them in if the weather closes in cold and wet.

We get them trained on a grandpa's feeder fairly early on so that we can use that once they go outside... the first time we didn’t and the sparrows gorged on our expensive feed.

John


Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
07 Oct 2018 09:45 #542664 by Sue

Excellent report John M. Have you done costings on feed used etc? I would love to get some first hand data, and the weights when you process them too. Could you message me with details?

I'm writing an article and have some theoretical figures but would love some actuals. I can give you a prompt list as to what I'm looking for if needed.


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 13951
  • Thank you received: 351
07 Oct 2018 10:22 #542669 by LongRidge

What do you do with 31 meat chickens that are ready to be killed, because you cannot sell them dead, and a buyer should keep them alive for 28 days before they a turned into meat?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 765
  • Thank you received: 52
07 Oct 2018 11:25 #542671 by Anakei

LongRidge wrote: What do you do with 31 meat chickens that are ready to be killed, because you cannot sell them dead, and a buyer should keep them alive for 28 days before they a turned into meat?


Presumably he has a big freezer :dry:

I have only processed spare cocks at about 6 months. They have free ranged and I've always been disappointed at their scrawnyness and lack of breast meat. They have been a variety of "dual purpose" varieties such as barred rock and light sussex. I have some gingernut rangers at the moment and I'm thinking about hatching some of their eggs, Problem is the cock is a shaver cross so the progeny are unlikely to be big meaty birds! Still good for soup. I might enclose them for a couple of weeks before processing and see if that improves the weight and texture.
Can't wait for your article Sue - I always learn such a lot from you


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 13951
  • Thank you received: 351
07 Oct 2018 12:38 #542673 by LongRidge

I too have been rather concerned about the lack of bulk on the 6 month old roosters that I've done, but they have been very tasty :-).

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
07 Oct 2018 12:44 #542674 by Sue

I'm trying to include all the options in my article, including the use of home bred roosters, or getting someone elses roosters-for free!

You can contain the older roosters and feed them meat bird crumbles or a high protein and fat diet, and try to get them to gain weight. Roosters that have reached crowing age will always be dark meat and scrawny with little fat!

OK for soup and very slow cooking. You could always skin them rather than pluck and cut them up into portions, Thighs, and drumsticks and wings plus breast muscle such as it is- leaving you with the backbone and rib cage to boil for soup- or feed raw to the dogs!


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.
Last Edit: 07 Oct 2018 12:45 by Sue.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 976
  • Thank you received: 151
07 Oct 2018 15:41 #542677 by tonybaker

I raised a batch of 30 Cobbs, and lost only 3. The downside is that it puts you off buying chickens from the supermarket as you realise that they are only about 4-6 weeks old with barely any feathers!
I let some go to 8 weeks and they were still tasty. Currently planning my next batch and will use a large wooden box with newspaper in the bottom to start with. Now is a good time to start as nights are warmer. I use and old waterbed heater as warmth is critical.
I never free ranged mine but kept them in a large run as they were not inclined to move about much anyway.
Once you have all the gear, it's relatively straightforward. We killed about 10 at a time and got them in the freezer smartly. A killing cone is great, shove their heads in and cut their throats.
The meat is superior to shop bought as they are not pumped up with water. I am not sure about the economics of the exercise, but we sold a few to cover costs, everyone liked them!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
07 Oct 2018 17:43 #542678 by Sue

Thanks for your in put Tony, every little helps with putting together my article.
Those of you rearing chickens here is the commercial management guide. There may be some interesting statistics for you reagarding ideal brooding temperatures and expected weight for age.
www.cobb-vantress.com/docs/default-sourc...management-guide.pdf


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1709
  • Thank you received: 18
07 Oct 2018 19:39 #542680 by Deanna

Last year I raised 20 meat bird with 50 shaver one day old chicks, inside for about a month, but because of good weather I was able to put them in a coop early. I raised them on 4 hot water bottles only, changed 4 times a day initially then down to 2 times a day. I raised them in a wooden cart. Kept them in the garage and popped them outside on sunny days. Woollen blanket over the cart at night. I never lost one chick. Not way monetarily is it worth it, but if you care about what they are fed etc, well there’s no price on that is there. One is still alive a year later. Can’t bring myself to do anythjng with it, lucky last as they say.


25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, 1 Wiltshire Ram (Trevor The 3rd) 16 ewes, 2Wethers, 3 calves. 70 chickens, Shavers, 72 ducks (Khaki, Pekin/Khaki, Cayuga/Appleyards, Magpies, Muscovies, X Runners) 1 Bee Hive, 2 dogs ( Fred and Diesel, ) 6 cats (Honey, Sassy, Cocoa, Golly, Miss Molly & Wally) 1 husband (Grumpy) 4 grown up chilblains and 2 grandies.[:D]
Last Edit: 07 Oct 2018 19:40 by Deanna.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • John M
  • John M's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Black shedding sheep
  • Posts: 622
  • Thank you received: 12
07 Oct 2018 20:10 #542681 by John M

I raise them purely for our own freezer/table. I have two large freezers :) and at varying times they are both full. Sometimes it’s 30 odd chickens, other times it’s a cattle beast, 6 lambs, a couple of pigs etc.

The batches vary on cost depending on my situation, but usually close out similar value to a good supermarket chicken, however, we're usually ending up with a 2.0-2.8kg dressed carcass so a lot heavier yield than supermarket birds. Besides, I know what has gone into them, they have had free ranging and eaten more than meat bird feed. They eat grass, scratch in the gravel and eat bugs as well.

Sue, more than happy for you to drop me a PM with some specifics that I can look at assisting you with.

John


Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
08 Oct 2018 09:47 #542687 by Sue

Thanks for your input JohnM, have PM'd you!

Obviously when you keep the specially bred meat bird chicks to 8 weeks old (and feed them well and keep them warm) they grow to bigger finished size than the birds found in the supermarket shelves which are processed at an earlier age.

These hybrid meat birds have the potential to grow very big. The 2014 targets for 10 week old Ross males is 5.5kgs liveweight and the target weight for females is 4.5kgs! Fed on a diet restricted in quantity and nutrients, plus in less than ideal temperatures ( ie less than 20C at night!) they will be a bit lighter by 10 weeks, and this also helps their bone structure to develop and harden up, with less weight to carry around.

The target feed consumption at this age is around 11kgs/bird (more or less for roosters and pullets) The food cost per bird alone is going to be in the region of $20!


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • John M
  • John M's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Black shedding sheep
  • Posts: 622
  • Thank you received: 12
09 Oct 2018 08:54 #542704 by John M

We processed all our batch yesterday. Looks like purchase and feed costs equate to $10.58 each. A few lighter birds under the 2.0kg, but most are in the 2.0-2.5kg dressed weight.

John


Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Sue
  • Sue's Avatar
  • Offline
  • valued contributor
  • Moos and clucks
  • Posts: 11822
  • Thank you received: 180
09 Oct 2018 10:04 #542705 by Sue

Good result JohnM, can't get meat much cheaper than that per kg.

In my costings I am allowing a token amount for heat, medications and a range of feed and chick cost which makes the final result more than you have achieved,
Of course no-one ever costs labour in these home grown scenarios either!

Eight weeks seems to be an ideal time for these fast growing birds to achieve good oven ready size for most families.


Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.387 seconds
Go to top