Topic-icon m. bovis latest update

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08 Aug 2018 09:32 #541397 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 38
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 64
Number of samples received by AHL 188,884
Number of tests completed 174,677
Number of traced properties 4620

One new IP but four more farms return to business

One more North Canterbury dairy farm has been confirmed to be infected. The farm is connected to known infected farms through animal movements. Tracing work from this farm is currently underway.

At the same time, four previously M.bovis-infected farms have had their IP status lifted. One Canterbury and three Southland farms were depopulated, decontaminated and have completed a 60-day stand-down period. MPI’s Recovery Team will assist the farms to return to normal operations.

The total number of currently active IPs stands at 38. These are made up of 18 beef farms, 17 dairy farms and 3 lifestyle properties. A total of 173 properties that were previously under movement controls from MPI have tested negative and had the controls lifted.


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08 Aug 2018 09:49 #541398 by Ruth

Have there been any releases about the progress of milk testing?

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08 Aug 2018 12:22 #541400 by kate

Nothing more than is below as far as I know...


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08 Aug 2018 13:10 #541401 by Stikkibeek

The latest from Keith Woodford

Bovis


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 Aug 2018 11:58 #541467 by max2

I was under the impression that every dairy farmer had been bulk milk tested. However I picked up a replacement heifer earlier this week and all they were asked to do was send in two samples from their sickest cows. So they picked two mastitis cows to sample.

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11 Aug 2018 12:11 #541468 by Ruth

MPI releases are still talking of upcoming spring milk sampling. The sick cow sampling was last year, wasn't it? Or earlier this year; not this new milking season.

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11 Aug 2018 14:23 #541471 by max2

Ruth wrote: MPI releases are still talking of upcoming spring milk sampling. The sick cow sampling was last year, wasn't it? Or earlier this year; not this new milking season.


Not sure Ruth although i know it was some time ago with that family. I ''thought'' everyone had been bulk milk tested in the current season.....

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11 Aug 2018 16:45 #541473 by Cigar

The current season has barely started in most areas. If I recall correctly the plan was to do three tests over 6 weeks (or was it six weeks apart?), starting a month after calving. So in many areas it's time for the first test about now. Down south a lot of farms will have just started calving, even here in the Waikato most will be two-thirds to three-quarters calved, and you want to test all the cows not just the early calvers.

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13 Aug 2018 10:53 #541513 by kate

MPI release:

A science advisory group has been formed to strengthen current efforts to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis), and met for the first time on 31July 2018.

Members of the newly-formed M. bovis Strategic Science Advisory Group (the advisory group) will provide high-level strategic scientific advice to the Mycoplasma bovis Governance Group. Science continues to be critical to the M. bovis response, and the advisory group will be a valuable resource to enable current science activities to be scaled up and expanded.

"The advisory group will ensure we have on-going access to some of the best minds and knowledge relating to M. bovis, which will bolster the eradication effort,” says Roger Smith, head of Biosecurity New Zealand and chair of the Mycoplasma bovis Governance Group.

The advisory group involves a range of relevant expertise from New Zealand and internationally.

They will contribute their expertise on a range of science matters, including:

identifying any critical knowledge gaps and ways to address them, including considering emerging technologies and ideas that may help eradicate M. bovis
prioritisation of M. bovis research efforts
coordination of current and future science initiatives relating to M. bovis
learning from other research programmes in New Zealand and internationally
providing assurance that M. bovis eradication research efforts remain fit for purpose.
"The members of the advisory group understand this is an unsettling time for many farmers and are moving quickly. They held their second meeting this week to start the development of their detailed work plan to shape the long-term science strategy,” says Dr John Roche, chair of the advisory group, and the Ministry for Primary Industries’ departmental science adviser.

"The group has already identified some key priorities for immediate work, and will hold a workshop in September to get wider input into developing the broader science plan," says Dr Roche.

"Scientific research is a vital part of our efforts to eradicate M. bovis." says Mr Smith.

Advisory group members

John Roche – departmental science adviser, MPI (Chair).
Glenn Browning – professor, director, Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia.
Hamish Gow – professor of agribusiness, Massey University.
Nigel French – distinguished professor, executive director of the Infectious Disease Research Centre, Massey University.
Axel Heiser – senior scientist, immunology, AgResearch.
William McMillan – independent agri-business consultant and scientist; Kaiārahi Ahuwhenua, Federation of Māori Authorities.
Trish McIntosh – director, North Canterbury Vets.
Roger Ayling – private consultant with extensive M. bovis research experience, United Kingdom.
Cameron Stewart – research scientist, Disease Prevention and Detection, CSIRO.
James Turner – resource economist and senior social scientist, AgResearch.
Shaun Hendy – director, Te Pūnaha Matatini, University of Auckland, complex systems, networks, and mathematical modelling.
Prue Williams – general manager Science System Investment and Performance, MBIE.
Veronica Herrera – director, Diagnostics and Surveillance Services, MPI.

Background to Mycoplasma bovis

Mycoplasma bovis is a bacterium that can cause a range of serious conditions in cattle – including mastitis that doesn’t respond to treatment, pneumonia, arthritis, and late-term abortions.

The disease may be dormant in an animal – causing no symptoms at all. But in times of stress (for example, calving, drying-off, transporting, or being exposed to extreme weather), the animal may shed bacteria in milk and nasal secretions. As a result, other animals may be infected and become ill or carriers themselves. The disease does not pose a health risk for humans.

This is the first time it has been found in New Zealand. The bacteria is an Unwanted Organism under the Biosecurity Act 1993.

As at 7 August 2018, the disease is still not widespread (37 confirmed infected farms) and there is just one strain of the disease here.

Mycoplasma bovis eradication decision

On 28 May 2018, it was announced that the Government, along with the dairy and beef industries, agreed that an attempt will be made to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis. This means we're trying to completely get rid of Mycoplasma bovis from New Zealand's dairy and beef herds. Science is a key part of this. The Government is investing $30 million over 2 years in scientific research to support the fight against Mycoplasma bovis.

DairyNZ, Federated Farmers, and Beef+Lamb New Zealand support MPI's decisions. They also recognise that this is a difficult time for the farmers involved.

The industry organisations believe that the measures are necessary to protect all New Zealand cattle farms from the disease. New Zealand is one of the few countries where Mycoplasma bovis is not found naturally. Because of this, the industry groups support measures to keep it that way.


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14 Aug 2018 16:53 #541541 by kate

MPI release

Biosecurity New Zealand today confirmed a property in the Tasman district as positive for the bacterial cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis. It's the first time the disease has been found in this region.

The affected property is a mixed sheep and beef farm near Motueka. The farm was identified through the tracing of animals from known infected farms. It is connected to other infected properties through animal movements.

As with all other infected properties, this farm is now under a Restricted Place Notice under the Biosecurity Act 1993. This effectively places the farm in quarantine lockdown – restricting the movement of animals and other risk goods on and off the farm.

While the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) won’t be publically naming the farm, neighbours who share a boundary with the infected property will be notified by MPI. The risk to neighbouring farms is very low.


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14 Aug 2018 17:35 #541543 by Ruth

I have been wondering how many of the neighbours of leased or short-term or occasionally-grazed blocks get notified in this process, if a farm is in this situation? I.e. potentially infected cattle could have been grazing such blocks up until the RPN is imposed, at which point it is presumably only immediate neighbours who are notified, but those on the boundaries of the other blocks would have been at risk until that point.

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14 Aug 2018 18:25 #541544 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 35
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received by AHL 190,285
Number of tests completed 175,324
Number of traced properties 4763

198 properties previously under movement controls from MPI have tested negative and had the controls lifted. This includes 28 previously infected properties. Three more farms have been confirmed as Infected Properties, including the first one in the Tasman region. Oamaru and Ashburton regions have one new IP each. At the same time, one Southland property had its IP status lifted. The total number of currently active IPs stands at 35.


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Last Edit: 14 Aug 2018 18:42 by kate.

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15 Aug 2018 09:51 #541549 by kate

Ruth wrote: I have been wondering how many of the neighbours of leased or short-term or occasionally-grazed blocks get notified in this process, if a farm is in this situation? I.e. potentially infected cattle could have been grazing such blocks up until the RPN is imposed, at which point it is presumably only immediate neighbours who are notified, but those on the boundaries of the other blocks would have been at risk until that point.


From what I understood from a briefing a month or so ago, there have been no properties that have caught the infection from their infected neighbours as yet. The 'keep them away from contact at the boundary' is a precaution. I think all cases so far have been through animal movements from one farm to another.

Not saying that's true, just what I was told ;)


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15 Aug 2018 09:56 #541550 by Ruth

Yes, that appears to be the case thus far but, if you're going to tell the immediate neighbours, why not also include the immediate grazing neighbours as well, since that risk is about the same?

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15 Aug 2018 11:50 #541553 by kate

I agree...but I think it's less about managing risk that managing perceptions of obsessive secretiveness...


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15 Aug 2018 13:07 #541554 by Ruth

I perceive they're not managing either very well.

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17 Aug 2018 19:46 #541604 by kate

Latest information
Number of confirmed infected properties 35
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received by AHL 192,620
Number of tests completed 177,909
Number of traced properties 4763

Law changes to support M. bovis eradication

This week, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor announced a package of technical law changes to support the M. bovis eradication. These changes will not require most people to do anything different than they are expected to do already.

First, changes to the NAIT Act 2012 will strengthen requirements around declaration of animal movements and align search powers with the Search and Surveillance Act. These changes go no further than powers that already exist under other Acts, which allow officers to lawfully obtain information where non-compliance is an issue.

Second, three infringement offences have been created under the Animal Products Act 1999, related to non-compliance with certain Animal Status Declaration requirements.

Finally, from 10 September M.bovis will become a notifiable organism under the Biosecurity Act. This means people who suspect the presence of the disease in a new location must report it to MPI. Vets, dairy and beef farmers, calf rearers and staff at commercial labs are the people most likely to suspect the presence of M. bovis. They can notify by calling MPI’s Pest and Disease Hotline on 0800 809 966.


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17 Aug 2018 22:54 #541608 by Stikkibeek

So will this strengthen likelihood of prosecution for tardy NAIT users? And NAIT itself?


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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18 Aug 2018 08:28 #541612 by Kilmoon

The new powers of MPI (signed into law under urgency the other night) means that anyone with rural land - from farmers of all sorts through to lifestylers - are now to be treated worse than drug dealers. No warrant (or sound reasoning) will be needed by MPI to come on to your property to search and seize whatever they deem necessary. If you own rural land you now have no rights under the law and are treated as guilty until you can prove your innocence. We're obviously the worst type of criminal that NZ now has.

Last Edit: 18 Aug 2018 08:29 by Kilmoon.
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18 Aug 2018 09:54 #541613 by max2

I thought the wording of the release this week was appalling. Namely that ''primarily farmers not registering animal movements and a lack of compliance activities to ensure NAIT’s use...."

Henk Smit said at the Cambridge meeting his stock that came up from the South Island were tagged and movements fully recorded. MPI had still (at the time of that meeting) failed to visit the hosting properties to test for M. Bovis yet knew exactly where those animals had been.

The people who I have had arguments with over the registration process (as well as issues re the visiting TB testing guy) have been (dare I say it) small block owners. Surely the wording ''stock owner'' could have been used so that the media release captures every stock owner's attention and not (again) attack farmers via the media and therefore public perception!.

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18 Aug 2018 10:27 #541614 by Ruth

Aren't all stock owners farmers? Do holders of small numbers consider themselves something else?

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18 Aug 2018 12:45 #541616 by max2

Ruth wrote: Aren't all stock owners farmers? Do holders of small numbers consider themselves something else?


The ones keeping a beast or two for the freezer don't see themselves as farmers from what I glean locally. The fellow who I had the ''to do'' with re the TB visit is retired from another trade. None would think the media release apply to them because they ''don't farm'' therefore are not farmers. Just people with a couple of cows .... :whistle:

Yes I know it doesn't make sense, but they will still continue to try and source unregistered cattle and the media release completely missed its mark.

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18 Aug 2018 15:16 #541620 by VioletFarmer

Yep, I have to agree with you there max2. Not 3 weeks ago some twit listed 3 Friesian x yearling heifers for sale 'make an offer' on my local fb lifestyle page. She literally had no idea what NAIT was & when I explained, she said "im a hairdresser, these are just pets, but we are running out of feed, so they have to go". :evil: I don't mean to be unkind, but there are too many 'thick as two bloody planks' types that have 'pet' farm animals and zero brain cells. I took screen shots of her listing & passed to the relevant people, but she would no doubt have already sold them, by the time anyone at NAIT or OSPRI pulled finger. No doubt sold to a similar type of person as herself. 'Stock owner' or 'anyone who owns cattle' would have been better & literally list what types of cattle.... heifer/ steer/ cow/ bull. I still get people saying "but we only have beef cattle, they aren't dairy".... and the cattle they have are literally Hereford X Friesian/ Jersey :blink:

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18 Aug 2018 23:39 #541628 by Ronney

The map cannot be displayed, you haven't specified a location yet.
I'm sorry VioletFarmer, but your lady is not as "thick as two short planks" - this is what comes about when Lsb'ing occurs and is outside the sphere of "farming" - because they are not farming. This also applies to your post Max.

Historically, farming has always meant somebody who earns their living from the breeding, rearing, milking and sale/purchase of livestock. 40 years ago there was no such thing as a LSB; the closest to it would have been retired farmers who could no longer run a farm but didn't want to relinquish completely their involvement with stock so retired to 20-30 acres. Then it became fashionable to own from several acres to maybe 30 and that became a whole different ball game. Most don't see themselves as farmers anymore than I see myself as a horticulturist just because I have a vegetable garden or an orchardist just because I have a dozen fruit trees.

These people are not going to toe the line by having a "to-do" with them because quite simply, they are not farmers and don't understand what it's all about. There are ways and means of going around this - and it doesn't involve sending pictures to MPI. If it doesn't work, leave it alone and let MPI do what they're bloody well paid to do - which for the last 40 years has been SFA.

And therein lies the other problem. MAF, MPI and the dozen names they've operated under, are still back in the 1960's when travel was by ship and only the rich came and went by plane. Tourism hardly existed - literally. It was too far and too expensive to get here. So they lounged around in the ivory tower and continued to do so. The number of weeds, insect pests and diseases that have entered this country in the last 30-40 years leaves the early settlers looking like saints by comparison - at least they managed to pretty well stock this country without bringing in F&M and that was long before tests were available for it. Go figure. Now, we're all going to pay the price.

I'm as cynical about M.Bovis as Kilmoon would appear to be - and with good reason.

Cheers,
Ronnie

Last Edit: 18 Aug 2018 23:42 by Ronney. Reason: An s was a better option than a d.

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19 Aug 2018 21:00 #541641 by Sue

I know it is slightly off topic' but we have just been audited by MPI as to our farming practices!

Evidently they have to do a certain number of audits per year and we drew the short straw. They were following up our traceability following animals which have our NAIT number which had been sent to the works and the ADS shhets which accompanied them. Lots of questions- but I'm pleased to say I think we 'passed'!

Various topics discussed including M.Bovis, accuracy of the NAIT system, and more!

I had to chuckle at the comment -'young stock and yards were checked from the road'....


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22 Aug 2018 08:16 #541675 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 35
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received by AHL 194,263
Number of tests completed 179,611
Number of traced properties 4940

No new IPs but more farms have controls lifted

So far this week, there has been no new Infected Properties (IPs) confirmed and no restrictions lifted from existing IPs. IPs’ total remained at 35, made up of 18 dry stock farms, 16 dairy farms and 1 lifestyle block. The total of properties under a Restricted Place Notice stayed at 58.

However, as of 5pm 21 August, the number of farms MPI has lifted movement controls from has further grown to 222. This figure combines both NODs and RPNs that have been lifted, and includes 28 previous IPs. All of the IPs had to complete depopulation, decontamination and a 60-day stand-down period, before coming off restrictions. MPI’s Recovery Team then helps them return to normal operation.


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23 Aug 2018 13:37 #541694 by kate

A controversial intensive beef farming operation has been served notice from the Ministry of Primary Industries that 44 of its 16,000 cattle could have Mycoplasma bovis.

Canterbury's Five Star Beef, owned by Anzco, made headlines this week after animal welfare group Safe's drone footage revealed the scale of its South Island feedlot.

The Ashburton feedlot, which primarily supplies beef to the Japanese market and locally under the brand Wakanui Beef, is the largest in the country.

It is home to 16,000 cattle at the moment, but has resource consent for up to 19,000 cattle to live within its pens, where they live for two-to-eight months before being sent to slaughter.

Full story


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23 Aug 2018 14:15 #541695 by Ruth

Didn't everyone know that was there? (Obvious 'no' to that question.) It's visible as you fly into Christchurch from the south, visible on Google Earth/maps. I seem to have known about it for years, when there was talk at the Peria saleyards of buyers from that far south trying to source good Angus calves.

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23 Aug 2018 18:31 #541701 by Anakei

One would have to question what a feedlot that size will do to the "clean green" image of NZ products. The western world is moving towards "clean "eating and grass fed beef is high on that list. If you think its a fad then just look how free range chicken, free range pork, free range eggs,and organic meat ( and other organic produce) has taken off in the past 10 years. Consumers do care about the provenance and welfare of their animal products.


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23 Aug 2018 22:03 #541703 by Ruth

Anakei wrote: One would have to question what a feedlot that size will do to the "clean green" image of NZ products. ...

Nothing for the last 27 years.

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23 Aug 2018 22:35 #541705 by Stikkibeek

I do wonder at the possibility effluent will leach into waterways or even the sea given its proximity with that sort of intensive farming.

However, I wouldn't trust that kriek idiot as far as I could kick him after the fuss he made about me needing to shift my horse. Grrr! :angry:


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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24 Aug 2018 10:18 #541709 by Stikkibeek

So, supposing they are growing all those turnip crops on the effluent pumped out of the holding pond (Which is right beside the beach) and knowing that the vast amount of Canterbury plains are built on river gravel, and, with the Ashburton river running alongside the cropping fields, then it is inevitable that leachate will get into rivers, and sea, and probably the aquifers also.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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24 Aug 2018 10:37 #541710 by Ruth

I thought that the first time I saw the set-up. But no doubt that is all "permitted activity".

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25 Aug 2018 10:22 #541738 by kate

Number of active confirmed Infected Properties 37
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received by AHL 195,746
Number of tests completed 181,971
Number of traced properties 5137

Two more IPs confirmed

A Waikato dry stock farm has been confirmed as an Infected Property (IP). In the same week, a beef finishing operation in Canterbury has also been confirmed as an IP. The properties are connected to the previously known IPs through movements of stock. Tracing work from these properties is now taking place. There are 37 currently active IPs in total, made up of 20 dry stock properties, 16 dairy farms and one lifestyle property.

As of today, MPI has lifted a total of 225 legal notices for M. bovis (both Notices of Direction and Restricted Place Notices). These farms have either undergone surveillance and tested negative, or went through depopulation and cleaning, and completed their 60-day stand-down period.


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25 Aug 2018 10:26 #541739 by kate

Changes to NAIT law

You may have heard the Government has made technical changes to the NAIT Act to address shortcomings in the old law, some of which have arisen during the Mycoplasma bovis response.

The changes clarify rules for inspecting properties and collecting evidence. However, they do not give MPI NAIT officers any new powers to enter a farm. Our officers could already enter a farm to inspect for NAIT compliance under the old laws.

It’s important to point out that these powers to inspect do not extend to a house or living quarters (or a marae). To do this our officers need a court-ordered search warrant. If a farmer’s office is in their house, this also can’t be entered without a search warrant.

The old laws were not clear about what evidence could be collected during an inspection – that has now been cleared up. Evidence collection can include copying documents (like an Animal Status Declaration) and taking photos or videos (for example of cattle without NAIT tags).

Another shortcoming cleared up in the law change was around unregistered addresses. Before, you could send an animal to a property that was not NAIT registered, not record the movement and face no consequences. That defeats the purpose of NAIT and undermines the ability to respond to Mycoplasma bovis. But common sense has been applied and this would now be an offence, just like not recording animal movements to a registered address.

Finally, from 10 September Mycoplasma bovis will become a notifiable organism under the Biosecurity Act. This means people who suspect the presence of the disease must report it to MPI.

An effective NAIT system is critical to supporting the eradication programme. Find out more about the technical changes at www.mpi.govt.nz/nait .


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28 Aug 2018 19:04 #541816 by kate

Number of active confirmed Infected Properties 35
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 56
Number of samples received by AHL 197,918
Number of tests completed 184,617
Number of traced properties 5246
Two more IPs lifted

So far this week, two more Canterbury farms had their IP status lifted. These farms were depopulated, cleaned and disinfected. Following this, they completed their 60-day stand-down period. MPI’s Recovery team is now assisting the farms with returning to normal operation.

There are 35 currently active IPs in total, made up of 18 dry stock beef farms, 16 dairy farms and one lifestyle property. As of today, MPI has revoked a total of 240 legal notices for M. bovis (both Notices of Direction and Restricted Place Notices).


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31 Aug 2018 11:14 #541861 by kate

Biosecurity New Zealand today confirmed a property in Northland has tested positive for the bacterial cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis. It's the first time the disease has been found in this region.

The infected property is a dry stock beef farm. The farm, as with all other infected properties, was identified through the tracing of animals movements from known infected farms and is under a Restricted Place legal notice under the Biosecurity Act 1993.

This effectively places them in quarantine lockdown – restricting the movement of animals and other risk goods on and off the farm.

Biosecurity New Zealand will not be publicly naming the farm and neighbours who share a boundary with the infected property have been notified. The risk to neighbouring farms is very low.

As part of the Government and sector group programme to eradicate the disease, all infected groups of cattle on the farm will ultimately be culled, in agreement with the farmer concerned around timing.

The response continues to make progress, with a total of 30 farms having been cleaned and depopulated. They are now moving forward with their farming businesses.

Biosecurity New Zealand is planning a public meeting for next week in Northland and further information on the location and time will be released in the next few days. Keep an eye on the MPI Facebook page for event details.

This is a good opportunity for farmers to check that they have robust biosecurity practices in place. Some simple steps farmers can take include:

carefully consider the disease status of new stock before animals are bought or moved
ensure visitors clean and disinfect their equipment, clothing, and footwear upon arrival to your farm
ensure boundary fences are secure and prevent nose-to-nose contact with neighbouring stock
provide young calves with special protection, allowing only essential people in the calf shed.


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01 Sep 2018 08:26 #541871 by Kilmoon

From the below website are updates from a farmer under a NOD notice. Look at the numbers....then start engaging the brain - they are not stopping this.
www.interest.co.nz/rural-news/95610/font...-payout-now#comments

Belle's comments are copied below:

by Belle | Fri, 31/08/2018 - 16:29
up3
We now have well over 5000 properties with a forward contact mbovis animal. MPI are lauding the fact they have found another positive in Northland yet exploding ahead of them are movements of cattle to more farms. Apparently we have 90000 Nait users. According to MPI we now have more than 5% of Nait registered properties with a forward contact animal. Wtf.

by Belle | Sat, 01/09/2018 - 07:22
up0
MPI have put out a new format for their numbers. This now does not include the total number of forward contact farm properties.
Over 5000 New Zealand properties have a forward contact mbovis animal.
24/8/18 this was 5137
21/8/18 this was 4940
It grew by nearly 200 in three days.
This figure is mindblowing
I do not see any media picking this figure up
But I do see MPI have not published an updated figure in their late night friday update.
Why are we carrying on with eradication when according to MPIs own figures more than 5 percent of NZ farm properties have a forward contact mbovis animal.
Can anybody out there explain to me why 5000 NZ farms with an mbovis contact animal isnt a problem? I really want to know why I am under a NOTICE OF DIRECTION while nearly 5000 other farms arent?
Why? I personally know several farms who bought animals from the same place I did, same age group, who are not under a NOD and free to move and sell their cattle.
What the HELL is going on?

by Belle | Sat, 01/09/2018 - 07:27
up0
m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1106956916...28&id=94425729906115 ...

by Belle | Sat, 01/09/2018 - 07:32
up0
m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1106956916...28&id=94425729906115 ...
Flick to photo 2/18 this format which gives all the current figures has been changed. They seem to have done away with the scary stuff.

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01 Sep 2018 10:18 #541873 by Ruth

Why wouldn't 5% be worth eradication? As part of the 94+%, it seems reasonable still to me.

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01 Sep 2018 13:53 #541875 by Kilmoon

Ruth, Belle's posts on the topic are along the lines that though there are 5000 (and counting) forward notified farms they haven't be told to stop trading cattle. So potentially infected cattle are still allowed to be sold and shifted without any notifications etc. So the number of farms with traced stock will just continue to grow....as there is nothing to stop the selling on of these cattle and any cattle they have come in contact with.

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01 Sep 2018 16:34 #541876 by Mudlerk

One way to decide whether to trust a report is to examine the frequency of emotionally loaded words and phrases [if there are a lot, then the writer trying to excite rather than inform you]
Belle's choices include: 'lauding', 'exploding' 'apparently' 'wtf', 'mindblowing', 'I do not see', what the HELL'. I much prefer Kilmoon's translation.

Last Edit: 01 Sep 2018 16:37 by Mudlerk.

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01 Sep 2018 17:38 #541877 by Kilmoon

Mudlerk, I get feeling that Belle is really frustrated with the process....now they're experiencing it.

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01 Sep 2018 17:52 #541878 by Ruth

But is she also expressing that frustration and experience to MPI? I wonder if she has directly asked them why they have not issued NODs to her acquaintances. They would not tell her the answer because of "privacy" but is she right? Or is the situation better than she believes? (These are obviously not questions I expect anyone here to answer.)

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02 Sep 2018 09:02 #541890 by Kilmoon

Ruth, from memory (and I'd have to trawl back through all Belle's posts to be 100% accurate) she did indicate that she had expressed her frustrations at the time (and during the initial part of the process?) when she got informed that she had a forward-traced bovine. Said bovine(s) had gone straight to a run-off block where they were part of a fattening operation before they would head straight to slaughter. She has mentioned her frustrations as to just how contagious M.bovis is (i.e., is it or isn't it), this is based on her discussions with the MPI people/blood testers/others etc who visited and the conflicting things/advice she has been told.

I read her posts as being an interesting insight into the MPI process from one who has been forward-traced and knowing others who have bought off the same source and not being indicated as being forward-traced. She raises a valid point on all these forward-traced farms: either M.Bovis is so contagious it means that they should all be under a NOD immediately they are identified and requiring the inevitable destocking and cleaning etc, OR M.Bovis is not that contagious and it's not until bloodtests are done that they can indicate whether a forward-traced animal has potentially passed on the disease to otherwise uninfected bovines on a property. (Remembering that the bloodtests are not highly accurate and they could come back as okay - no trace of M. bovis - whilst the bug was actually still there, and vice versa.)

Her argument (to me) is that in the meantime all these forward-traced farms can operate as per normal: selling cattle on to others (=more potential M.Bovis spread), selling to slaughter (okay, that takes care of spread, but what about the trucks they travel on), or just the normal moving cattle normally between a farmer's various blocks of land (=contamination spread via truck and then those trucks going onto the next job and moving other people's cattle), there is also the risk of contamination by normal farm vehicles (i.e., the trusty ute) to other places along the road (so potential to neighbouring farms via muck on vehicles).

It's is a fascinating process that MPI/govt are taking...and they're playing catch up all the way with no chance of getting ahead of its spread. From what I've read they lost that battle years ago when it came in and normal cattle movements in NZ indicated it would go the length and breadth of the country before they found it. The NAIT system is merely indicating just how far the majority of animals move in NZ between birth and slaughter. That is the lesson to learn from M.bovis.....our normal farming operating systems of specialists handing animals on to the next specialist in the line has meant a disease such as this can be spread rapidly and quickly before it can be detected. There is a reason that farmers in countries with M.bovis operate completely different to NZ - they have learnt to be closed systems to stop the easy spread of disease. So animals are born, raised, and sent to slaughter from a closed system.

It certainly is fascinating to watch the scramble to 'fix' this.

Last Edit: 02 Sep 2018 09:06 by Kilmoon.

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02 Sep 2018 09:55 #541891 by Ruth

I much appreciate your thoughtful take on it.

Certainly there are farmers who breed, farmers who rear (in the case of dairy/beef calves), farmers who grow on and/or finish cattle for beef and those have become 'specialties', ways of farming that suit particular farmers or farms. There is an annual shift of all age-groups of cattle for those reasons.

But it seems to me that in my own community, there is another type of "specialist", a handful of stock agents who have suggested the opportunity to make extra money to their cattle-trading clients. Those people are willing to trade in animals well beyond their own geographical areas for the sake of whatever margin they can make beyond local market pricing. They have no compunction in bringing animals from one end of one of our long country to the other, if it makes them some money. Hence there has been a direct pathway for transmission of disease from anywhere to anywhere else for several years. It's a despicable practice when you think about the animal welfare cost. Sure they'll survive, but why do they need to travel so far, to continue doing the same thing, just so some men can make some extra money? Add in a lax or resistant attitude to NAIT since its inception and here we are!

MPI don't look good. Think back over the last decade of reducing funding and how much protest was made about biosecurity failures and the potential for disastrous future events and again, here we are.

I understand the points being made by your quoted poster, but I'm always irritated, perhaps like Mudlerk, with the overblown expression of them when the facts are sufficiently damning on their own.

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02 Sep 2018 10:43 #541892 by Muz1

Ruth,
it is not always an extra profit motive that sees animals travel great distances. Weather events like drought or flooding have been causes for movement from region to region. This movement is a bio security problem as experienced in the 1971-2 droughts when stock were shipped out of the Horowhenua far and wide and on their return in a number of cases carried liver fluke and cattle tick. Little or no quarantine was practiced.
M.Bovis just happens to be in the news at present highlighting the many moves some animals make in their lives..

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02 Sep 2018 10:57 #541893 by Ruth

No, it is not always. Just a hell of a lot more than is reasonable or sensible; especially if you're an animal.
Region to region makes sense in emergencies but that's not what I was referencing.

Last Edit: 02 Sep 2018 10:58 by Ruth.

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02 Sep 2018 19:02 #541900 by Kilmoon

Ruth, I wonder if part of it (the distance travelled nowadays) has to do with the closure of the 'local works' for instance. It used to be that every town (almost) had its own abattoir, dairy/cheese processor, and salesyards etc. Now it seems like a year doesn't go by when I don't see a news story of the plucky little whatever succumbing to the inevitable and closing. So centralization, for supposed efficiencies of whatever some consultant is peddling, seems to be the norm nowadays.

So here we are decades later with a completely different type of system to animal movements that our parents/grand parents operated under. As a result I'm not surprised that a disease like m.bovis has spread so far....we have a system that enables it to spread faster than we can handle. Can you imagine what would happen, in terms of disruption, if everyone had to change back in order to effectively eradicate this disease? We no longer have processing plants (abattoir, milk, and sales etc) situated near where we 'produce' these animals or their products like milk. Collectively, (as a nation) we would have to decide whether the cost of rebuilding all that infrastructure was worth the increased final consumer price.....and we can't click our fingers and get it overnight, nor in a year. People say they want free range eggs....but they still buy the cheapest at the supermarket.

Trends are changing, local farmers markets indicate that, also the rise of farmers selling from 'paddock to plate' by processing their own animals and selling direct to the public. But I don't think it's going to be quick enough to solve those long distance transport welfare issues. When it comes down to it people buy what they can afford to pay. Without the government making the decision for us (nanny state) nothing will change really....and if they do that, well they become un-electable. I'm possibly jaded, but no politician is going to willingly tell their voters "no", and us voters have proved that we are bribable to any party that promises us a 'better and easier' life. Look at the fuss over Labour's decision to stop new oil exploration....it's inevitable that the age of cheap abundant oil is over....but we still all want to drive and fly whenever we like. Plus buy cheap food like eggs.

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14 Sep 2018 18:04 #542170 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 37
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 57
Number of samples received from AHL: 203,573
Number of tests completed: 194,462
Number of traced properties: 5246

FOUR NEW INFECTED PROPERTIES IN CANTERBURY
Four more farms have been confirmed as Infected Properties – two dry stock farms and two dairy farms. All new IPs have received animals from the already known infected properties. Tracing work from these farms is now underway.

In the same week, four more previously infected farms had their IP status lifted. The farms were depopulated, cleaned and disinfected. Following this, they completed their 60-day stand-down period. MPI’s Recovery team is now assisting the farms with returning to normal operation.

NEW TRACES COULD LEAD TO PREVIOUSLY TESTED FARMS
As we continue eradicating M. bovis from New Zealand, more new farms are being placed under Restricted Place Notices (RPNs), some of which then become Infected Properties. Whenever a farm is placed under a RPN, we trace all animals that moved from that farm to other farms and vice versa.

At times, these new traces lead us back to farms that we have previously tested for M. bovis. In most cases, we don’t require these properties to undergo further testing. However, we cull all trace animals and take samples to confirm their disease status. We do this by issuing a Notice of Direction (NOD) to the stock owner under section 121 of the Biosecurity Act. Culling trace animals allows MPI to obtain the most accurate samples and limits the risk of spreading the disease further at the same time.


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22 Sep 2018 19:50 #542323 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 38
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received from AHL: 207,302
Number of tests completed: 197,121
Number of traced properties: 5977


ONE NEW IP IN NORTH OTAGO AND ONE LIFTED IN SOUTHLAND
A North Otago dairy farm has been confirmed as an Infected Property. The farm is connected to known IPs through stock movements. Tracing work from these farms is now underway.

In the same week, one more previously infected Southland farm had its IP status removed. After the infected stock was depopulated, the farm completed its 60-day stand-down period during which it was cleaned and disinfected. The Response Recovery team is now assisting the farm with returning to normal operation.


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02 Oct 2018 10:26 #542534 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 37
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 58
Number of samples received from AHL: 212,400
Number of tests completed: 201,527
Number of traced properties: 6570



ONE NEW IP IN TASMAN BUT TWO MORE LIFTED IN CANTERBURY
Second Tasman District farm has been confirmed as an Infected Property. The farm is connected to known IPs through stock movements. Tracing work from this farm is now underway.

However, two more previously infected Canterbury farms had their IP status revoked. After the infected stock was depopulated, the farms completed their 60-day stand-down period during which they were cleaned and disinfected. The Response Recovery team is now assisting the farm with returning to normal operation.

M. BOVIS RESPONSE PLAN IS NOW ONLINE
The National Response Plan for M. bovis is now available online. This comprehensive document sets out the national-level direction for the phased eradication of M. bovis from New Zealand. The plan enables various aspects of the response operations including disease management, acute recovery and welfare. You can find the plan on our website at this link .


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03 Oct 2018 09:54 #542549 by max2

Anakei wrote: One would have to question what a feedlot that size will do to the "clean green" image of NZ products. The western world is moving towards "clean "eating and grass fed beef is high on that list. If you think its a fad then just look how free range chicken, free range pork, free range eggs,and organic meat ( and other organic produce) has taken off in the past 10 years. Consumers do care about the provenance and welfare of their animal products.


I recall watching Hugh Fearnley W's battery chook farming doco/show a few years back and he was interviewing consumers who were buying the 2 x 5 pound (I think was the token sum) chooks in the supermarket. Those buying them were aware of the controversy over how the chooks were housed, but at the end of the day it all came down to budget for them.

I'm also mindful of the families who do not prepare and eat a fully cooked meal at home but rather head to the local greasy shop for takeaway. I don't know if its because our last two workers have both been from families with a growing collection of children and a partner on the benefit but it seems we are the oddballs because we cook each meal at home. There certainly is a big divide of those who would consider the origins of their meal but there seems to be a huge number who do not.

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03 Oct 2018 11:09 #542552 by Sue

Max2, I know its going off the M Bovis topic but the same is true from people in NZ purchasing eggs! When interviewed going into the supermarket they talk positively about Free Range eggs, but on exiting-they buy the cheapest Cage produced eggs! The beef from the feed lots is probably mainly exported anyway!

Re the M.Bovis question, I'm just about to put together a report for our local paper as to why there will not be any cattle at our local A & P show this season. I need to write it in a positive light!!!
I am amazed about the scare mongering and total misunderstanding of the disease by the general public-even some of the farming fraternity.
I'm hoping MPI will come and put on a display in the empty cattle sheds at the Show-there is so much secrecy around I feel there needs to be education and somebody out front to be able to answer questions and outline implications of what is being done.


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09 Oct 2018 13:32 #542706 by kate

Number of confirmed infected properties 38
Number of properties under Restricted Place Notice 59
Number of samples received from AHL: 216,029
Number of tests completed: 210,115
Number of traced properties: 6,570

The Ministry for Primary Industry’s bulk milk testing for M. bovis is progressing well, with milk samples being taken from every dairy farm in New Zealand. The testing programme began shortly after the start of calving, when cows are most likely to be shedding the bacterium if they are infected.

Milk samples are being collected from each farm every two weeks, up to a total of six samples over 12 weeks. To date, almost 10,000 of New Zealand's 12,000 dairy farms have completed two rounds of testing.

So far only three farms have been confirmed with M. bovis through this testing. All three properties were already part of our tracing programme and they all have previously known links to the disease. This is very encouraging, but it’s still too early to speculate about the final results.

Calving on a number of farms was a few weeks later than expected, so full milk test results for the large majority of farms are now expected to be delivered to farmers in both the North and South Islands in early December – rather than in November as previously forecast.

We expect that about 2 per cent of farms will still be undergoing testing in early December. Results are expected to be delivered to those farmers by mid- January. In the meantime, if any suspicious results are found in a milk test, MPI will contact the farmer immediately.

Dairy companies will continue to keep farmers updated as the testing programme continues.

M. BOVIS SURVEY OF CALF REARERS UNDERWAY
The Response partners have taken the next step in the phased eradication of M. bovis by starting a survey of around 200 calf rearing properties across the country with MPI contacting owners of the selected calf rearing properties this week.

You can read more about it here .


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