Topic-icon Bottle jaw

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01 Jul 2018 07:45 #540717 by bbsa

I am curious if you have any advice after a sheep has bottle jaw, is there any chance she can live, she lambed about a month and a half ago to twins, we had wormed them before they had there lambs I guess we weren't doing a good job watching and now 3 days ago we wormed her with Albenazol, is that a good wormer? We plan to put her on new grass every day for a week. any suggestions? She still eats feed.
Thanks
I could post a picture if anyone wants to see how she looks

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01 Jul 2018 08:25 #540719 by Ruth

Do post a picture! Have you talked to your vet about her? That's the best source of information for an animal that isn't well.

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01 Jul 2018 09:35 #540722 by bbsa

Yes my dad talked with our vet and got Cydectin and some vitamin b12 now my question is how soon can you worm sheep again with new wormer after worming? (we wormed with albenanzol when can we worm with Cydectin)

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01 Jul 2018 09:51 #540725 by Ruth

If she's important to you, I'd take her to the vet (or get the vet to come out and see her). There may be more wrong with her than worms. Lambing and lactation are stressful and sometimes things like liver damage will become obvious around that time.

I presume you have little experience with sheep? A vet visit can seem expensive but you often learn so much about your animals that you didn't even know you didn't know. If you're going to keep them for a long time, it can be money well spent.

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01 Jul 2018 10:26 #540726 by bbsa

The vet said that the Cydectin should kill the worms and he also said the vitamin b12 injection is good for the anemia. He seemed to think thats what it was.
As for sheep we have had them for three years now, but we had goats for about 15 years and my parents always had animals (I still live at home) so I am not sure how experienced I am? They definitely are worth the money!

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01 Jul 2018 12:49 #540734 by Wren

bbsa wrote: Now my question is how soon can you worm sheep again with new wormer after worming? (we wormed with albenanzol when can we worm with Cydectin)


Our vets are very happy to answer this kind of question over the phone for no charge, so I'd just give them a ring and double check, making sure they have all the information about the situation. In the past I've been hesitant to 'bother' them but I've come to realise that even after hours I think most would happily chat with you about it, especially if it means avoiding a delay in your sheep getting the treatment she needs/getting an overdose of wormer.

I hope she comes right soon.


Muddling our way through 1Ha on the Christchurch Port Hills, with flocks of heritage chickens, Silver Appleyard ducks, Gotland sheep, and Arapawa goats.

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01 Jul 2018 13:30 #540736 by LongRidge

Bottle jaw can be caused by other things than just worms, but in this case it probably is worms, so they are the first to treat.
Drenches can be given one day apart so long as the correct dose was given. The -bendisols and -ectins have a 10 times overdose safety margin. So give her the Cydectin right now. If she is a small ewe she will weigh about 50 kg. Never, never under-dose so if you think she is bigger than small give her a 75 kg dose.
Never, never use Cydectin regularly because regular usage can result in the worms and external parasites becoming resistant to all the -ectins.

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01 Jul 2018 23:07 #540742 by bbsa

Thank you LongRidge! I wanted to hear from someone who knew, the vets probably would have given the same answer but we wouldn't have gotten it till Monday.
I also had wandered how much you should give concerning weight. So over IS better, we gave her for about 120lbs pretty sure she can't weigh that much...
Thanks again for your advice I appreciate that!

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02 Jul 2018 10:18 #540748 by LongRidge

Because you are working in "pounds" I presume and hope that you are in USA. Almost everywhere else dosages are give as per kilogram. Be careful converting pounds to kilograms and vice versa, and ensure that your measuring equipment is correct. You don't want to give a 120 kg dose to a 54 lb animal :-(
Another suggestion - if you are Northern Hemisphere then let us know that or we will presume that your problem is equivalent to ours at this time of the year :-).

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02 Jul 2018 22:04 #540767 by bbsa

Yes we live in the USA, in southwest Missouri.
The vet wrote on the bottle to give 1cc to every 11lbs so I gave her 11cc. We didn't weigh her but guessed she's around 100lbs or maybe 110, we weighed a 2 month old lamb and he weighed 40lbs so going off from his size we guess her around there, I hope we gave her the right dose? It's hard to guess a weight (close) Or I think so, other people could probably do a pretty good job.
Thanks for that reminder!

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03 Jul 2018 13:47 #540771 by LongRidge

Before I purchased a weighing platform and adapted it for sheep, we used to use bathroom scales to weigh the lambs. But the scales didn't measure over 120 kg, so only read me and a 36 kg lamb that I was holding. We now have bathroom scales that can read more than 120 kg, but with a platform I don't need to try to hold a heavy weight and stand on the scales and read the scales :-).
Your 8 week old lamb was born late for your hemisphere and would have been conceived about November. The problem with late conceptions is that the spring grass growth flush has passed, so neither the mother nor the lamb gets the much more nutritious high protein pasture. Also, a ewe that has not lambed early enough can make very large lambs so difficult to give birth to when eating this nutritious grass. They are also more likely to pick up worms from the grass they are eating. Also the lambs are more prone to fly strike if you use rubber rings to tail and castrate them :-(
But the advantage is that the weather is often more favorable for lamb survival later. If the genetics of both the mother and father are to make small lambs that slide out easily then that can cure the birthing difficulty problem. After 28 years, I have not found that perfect combination year, but this year we are going to be right (I sincerely hope).

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03 Jul 2018 22:07 #540773 by bbsa

Yes our lambs were born late, our ram we had was no good, so in November we bought another ram, so yes our lambs are definitely late. Our ewes didn't seem to have a problem having the lambs, We didn't watch one so maybe she did, but the lamb and her were fine when we saw them.
Is September about the right time or is that a little early?
Here is a picture of some of our sheep before we sheared them

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04 Jul 2018 09:36 #540778 by LongRidge

Often but not always, new lambs that are very yellow on the wool have had a protracted birth.
In NZ, most of our sheep lamb outdoors in the paddock. Exceptionally few sheep are kept indoors, even in the coldest parts of the south of the South Island. So the real farmers plan on lambing very close to when the grass is growing well enough in spring, which varies from June in the north to October in the south. so that is one of the considerations that we make when we decide when to lamb. I would think that for you, putting the ram out in September would be fine, assuming that your flock is large enough to be able to take him away from the ewes between June and then.

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04 Jul 2018 15:02 #540782 by Mudlerk

I grew up in Ohio...a bit further north. We'd have wanted lambs in early May there, so the Ohio rams out in early December.

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10 Jul 2018 05:37 #540897 by bbsa

I had meant to write the outcome on this sheep, after giving Cydectin and vitamin b12 in the evening. I thought the next morning she was a tad better. In two days it basically went down, by now she looks completely normal. Iam very thankful for all your suggestions and advise!!

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