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Topic-icon Rural Deliveries: What's the Secret

  • sempercapsicum
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28 Jun 2018 09:20 #540648 by sempercapsicum

Hi friends,

I'm about to move onto a lifestyle block with my partner and we're a bit puzzled as to what to do about recieving large boxes/parcels and deliveries. Here's our situation:

  • We live 1km down the road from our postbox, behind a locked farm gate that secures several properties.
  • Our post box will be right on the State Highway and we're worried about parcels getting nicked.
  • We're occasionally going to be receiving huge deliveries of things like a flatpack shed.
  • I'd feel bad having someone else have to recieve our huge parcels and stuff like that, but can't think of anything else to do.
Protips?

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28 Jun 2018 10:03 #540651 by LongRidge

Those big deliveries probably won't be sent through the RD system, but through a transport company. For large parcels you, or your representative, will have to be there to open the gate and to sign that the item has arrived. Phone your local RD office for their advice.

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28 Jun 2018 17:04 #540673 by Anakei

Phone the courier company to hold it at the depot until you can pick it up. If it requires a signature and they can't find anyone that is where it will end up anyway. Or find some one in town to take the delivery for you.


Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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28 Jun 2018 17:59 #540676 by tonybaker

Anakai has the right idea, I gave up on couriers ages ago as they won't come out for just a small parcel. Now I ask retailers to send parcels to our nearest town depot and pick it up myself. Saves a lot of hassle. Stuff being delivered by truck is another issue, despite GPS, truckies get lost easily! On the day of delivery, make sure you have your phone on you, and arrange to meet them somewhere nearby. I once even had the bailiff phone me as he couldn't find me!


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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30 Jun 2018 10:36 #540702 by neil postie

We often get parcels left at the local Wrightsons, a lot of people here do it. Up to about apple box size seems ok and as its in town rural rates don't apply

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30 Jun 2018 10:57 #540703 by Ruth

Our postie is so useless we gave up and have everything large delivered to town. Otherwise he would carry it around his bumpy run, leave a card in the mailbox the following day, and it would delay everything by at least three days. Some things are more urgent, some more fragile, some mor valuable than that sort of "service" will stand.
I have my Daleck delivered to RD1 each summer. (It's a nitrogen bank ... "Inseminate, inseminate ...")

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  • Belle Bosse
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04 Jul 2018 00:49 #540774 by Belle Bosse

Communication is the secret...

Our Rural Delivery Postie delivers large and small boxes, parcels, packages, 4x 25 kg bags of chicken feed, letters, news papers, courier post deliveries. Some other courier parcels are also delivered by the postie.
For large items like the chook feed, our Postie rings ahead so I can meet her with the car for the items.
Our mail box is 500 metres away from home on our main road in. At the request of our Postie, we have signed a drop off release form and installed a 200 litre barrel at our home gate for parcels to be dropped into if we are not home. She makes the detour to deliver the parcels.

Some couriers drop their boxes / parcels at their designated shops in town. Check with the courier company where their drop off points are.

As for the "big stuff", be there personally to receive the delivery. Meet the trucks at the gate and accompany/ direct them to the area for unloading.
My husband orders the items, tells me where it needs to be unloaded, keeps in touch with the freight company and lets me know the approximate time of arrival so I can meet them. At times the truck driver is in direct contact with me regarding time. So far communication has worked well...

I have handled quite a few Big Stuff deliveries since moving here...
Shipping containers delivered to our property. Met the trucks at the intersection, directed to unloading place and accepted the consignment.
One very long delivery (40 foot + 20 foot containers) arrived on sunset. Too late to unload, the truck parked up for the night at our main gate. I drove the truck driver 25 km to his friend's home for the night. His friend brought him back in the morning and we were able to safely complete the delivery. A little extra help at times is appreciated.

An order of steel mesh delivered. I was there to meet, help unload and sign for the consignment.
A new bath was organised for drop off at a transport company's nearest depot, which I collected by trailer.
Rock, pebble, builders mix and garden soil mix. Met the trucks at the intersection, or at our gate and directed to areas for unloading.

Yacht 45 foot (13.7 metre)... a boat haulage company delivered to our property. I met them at the intersection and explained where to go. The pilot vehicle checked the road first before taking yacht up the signed narrow road for unloading. Husband assisted with unloading and accepted delivery.

But... even with the best laid plans... Sometimes things take the long way round... Have had one consignment addressed to a Kerikeri depot, that unintentionally went to the Kaitaia depot. That took 4 hours out of my day chasing it up... 1 hr driving from home to Kerikeri depot only to find the item misdirected, two hours further to Kaitaia to collect the needed item and another hour home.
BUT..something else to be aware of is that... some transport companies may refuse to accept another freight company's items at their depot for your pick up.

I have had to organise a meeting place off the side of the Highway to collect items one trucking company was delivering. Their closest depot is Whangerei... 2 hours away. Next order they delivered was dropped off at what used to be RD1... easier for us both.

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04 Jul 2018 08:18 #540775 by tonybaker

yes, in the "good old days" a local trucking firm had the rural run and you could get anything picked up and dropped off from town. Now, if it sent by courier, you have to track it down yourself.
Lately, I have been wasting money on DX.com in China. Lots of bits and pieces of variable quality, but it is amazing that they can offer free delivery to NZ, even though it takes weeks to get here.


5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, ducks, Kune Kune pigs, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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04 Jul 2018 08:24 #540776 by sandgrubber

There's almost always a box for delivery instructions on the order form. Once you've figured out how/where etc, write out your instructions carefully, in detail, and save the text. Then copy and paste it each time you order something.

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04 Jul 2018 12:14 #540780 by Stikkibeek

Couriers around here are idiots. They depend heavily on GPS even when you tell them NOT to and give explicit directions. GPS here takes them to our hay paddock, nowhere near our house and they stare at an empty paddock, and then drive away saying they couldn't find us. They ignore the bold number on our entrance way. Luckily, the RD driver knows us, so we do get those small packages, and anything big we get dropped off at their depot, they ring, we go and collect.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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04 Jul 2018 12:46 #540781 by LongRidge

Don't relie on GPS. When we start to go up our drive the GPS tells us to "Go back" :-(.

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  • Belle Bosse
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10 Jul 2018 18:59 #540909 by Belle Bosse

Hmmm... if you are buying stuff over seas, it seems that no matter how careful you are to give the CORRECT address, the computer mailing check system seems to be able to readdress your parcel to what it thinks is correct, which can be totally WRong! Wrong post code and wrong town seems to be common.

Today's parcel that finally arrived has 4 destinations on it... three redirections, with twice to Kaitaia, who finally labelled it with the correct address.
The invoice address inside the parcel is correct...!!

I have previously received a somewhat distressed phone call from Kaitaia postal service asking for our real address so they could get it delivered...

I shall have to give Kaitaia a Thank you call for re-labelling the parcel correctly, and go visit the other posties...

Last Edit: 10 Jul 2018 19:02 by Belle Bosse.

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